TikTok is a social video-sharing app where users can share short videos cell-phone videos. Users can utilize filters, music, animation, special effects, and more. Like other social media apps, users can also follow, like, and comment on everything they watch, so what makes TikTok so special and why is it so hot right now? In this episode We talk about the basics of TikTok and get some first-hand tips from Izzy Lundquist – who has gone viral with her ACT prep videos on TikTok.


Shownotes


Episode Transcript

Missy 0:00
Welcome to the social feed podcast. I’m your host Missy, thank you for listening. In this episode, we get into the mind of Izzy Lundqvist, who is a Tik Tok superstar influencer.

Pat 0:10
Oh, what superstar?

Missy 0:12
Tik Tok, you heard it right. And this episode we dive into everything from what is Tik Tok who’s on it, what can brands be doing on it? And Izzy gives us some really great insider information on how she beat the algorithm how to beat the algorithm and how she creates content for Tik Tok. So let’s get into this week’s episode number 101. What is Tik Tok and how can marketers use it with special Tik Tok guessed the ACTA girl.

So, Tik Tok, um,

where can we start? I’m obsessed. I know. Pat doesn’t have Tik Tok.

Pat 0:51
I don’t have Tik Tok.

Missy 0:53
Why?

Pat 0:54
Because I’m old. So help me understand this thing.

Missy 0:59
We will catch you all up on everything you should know about Tik Tok to make you are enjoying.

Pat 1:04
Okay. All right, if you can get me to download Tik Tok reg. That will be a good episode.

Missy 1:08
Oh, Challenge accepted.

So to start, if you those of you who have maybe never heard of Tik Tok or maybe you’ve heard of it and like what the heck is that? Essentially, it’s a another social media platform just like Facebook, Instagram, Twitter. It’s another one out there. However, this one has been picking up a lot of steam lately because it’s really generated by video content, which is huge. And this was really interesting as I was doing more research, so it’s owned by a company called Bytedance, which is based out of China. And essentially, they bought the rights to musically Do you guys remember that? Yeah,

Anna 1:43
yeah. And I never conformed to music.

Missy 1:46
I didn’t either. I was not it was weird.

Anna 1:49
But here I am today. Tik Tok.

Missy 1:50
Tik Tok. He was like a resurgence. Yeah, basically. But what’s cool about it, is that how they basically took the music concept, but then they added a few other things. So the statement says they combine the power of artificial intelligence, with the growth of mobile internet to revolutionize the way people consume and receive information. So what the heck does that mean? Basically, they use artificial intelligence, like some facial recognition, they have a lot of filters on there. And they fill everyone’s feeds with highly customized, content based off of that. And it is interesting, because I have noticed, like on the for you page when you’re looking through that, I’m like, how do they know? Like, I don’t follow that person. How are they filtering that content?

Anna 2:05
I get so many like Wisconsin ones, like where they are. They’re like Wisconsin check. And I’m like, whoa. They’re following me.

Missy 2:46
So that’s the platform is it’s super addicting from a user standpoint. I mean, I could sit on here for a couple hours.

Anna 2:52
Well, you don’t even need to have an account. You could have the app and just scroll through the for you page. And yeah, you sit there for hours. They’re so funny.

Missy 3:01
And it’s just random stuff like people from all over that. I explained like how unless you have to, like download it to see it. But essentially, is people just picking funny songs, not songs just talking to. And it’s really creative.

Anna 3:15
The best are the 30 plus club is what they call it. It’s a hashtag. And they’re like moms who are like, oh, gosh, there was one because I’m going to try to do it. I close the door, and I don’t let anyone in the room until I finish it. But they always joke about how they shouldn’t be on here, but it’s funny being on here and it’s fun and they should be on like it shouldn’t be just a younger platform because it really is 24 years and younger.

Missy 3:44
So the main demo on tech talk right now. Anna, tell me how you got this deck again because this was like

Anna 3:52
I like to creep on LinkedIn and on Add age because I like to see what other company bunnies and big brands are doing for advertising. And somehow I ended up on someone’s LinkedIn page that had access to this. So I downloaded it. So legally.

Missy 4:11
So I’ll put this deck that Anna found. It’s like a Tik Toc deck and it has everything from the downloads compared to the other social networks, the age range, what Tick Tock is how it’s been growing. And it’s from Tik Toc and adage itself. So some really good info. So we’ll put a link to that on the site so you guys can download and check it out to

Anna 4:30
my favorite is that they say we don’t spark trends. We set them on fire, which is so true. Because it’s hard to figure out like, funny organic content by yourself. Like you’re more inspired by like what other people are doing and what’s on the for you page. But sometimes you’re like, Oh, I could do something like this, or I could twist it and that’s why the funniest ones come from like, their organic.

Pat 4:54
So speaking of organic and just funny content, what is it about Tik Toc that makes these So like is if somebody posted the same thing on tik tok versus Facebook or to their Instagram? Would it be the same? Is it? Is it the content? Or is it the way the content is consumed? What What is it that makes Tick Tock so special?

Anna 5:13
Like, you know, when you’re on the Facebook app, and you see all these funny videos, and then also you start scrolling through, it’s kind of like that, but it’s more accessible. And Tick tock, I don’t

Missy 5:24
know. I like that. What’s funny is I’ve noticed now when I’m on Facebook or Instagram, a lot of people will share their Tik Toc videos on there. So it’s starting to integrate into those other platforms already. But with Facebook, I mean, there’s the videos on there. They’re a little bit and this is gonna sound so millennial of me, they’re a little bit longer. We’re like the Tik Toc videos. It’s like, Okay, cool. How’d you do that project? Three seconds later. I know how it’s done. And they showed the process. Yes. Where it’s, it’s a lot shorter content. Sure. Or,

Anna 5:53
yeah, we have short attention. Yes.

Pat 5:56
Certainly.

Anna 5:56
We need things that are Go go go.

Missy 5:59
So too. Tik Toc was the most downloaded app in the world in 2018. And in q1 of 2019, in this deck that Anna found, they have like the overall downloads compared to the other platforms. I will say that that’s a little bit of an ego number because Facebook Instagram have been around for a long time. So of course, to touch the new hot thing, it’s going to be a lot more downloaded. But the fact that it stayed that way, and people are enjoying, that’s something to be aware of. Yes,

Anna 6:29
people are spending 46 plus minutes on the app each day in the US. like, That’s nuts.

Missy 6:37
So the biggest demo on tech talk right now is people between the ages of 18 and 24 42% of those users are on Tech Talk. And then next is ages 13 to 17 27%. And then above that it dwindles significantly. But I think one thing that’s coming into play is the privacy policies with Tic Tok because young people are on it. So they’re really cracking down on. I know, just a couple days ago when I was on the app and made me verify the terms and conditions again, oh, yeah, update all of that. So they’re really cracking down because it’s a lot of younger audience on the app.

Anna 7:14
Yeah, but I feel like I mean, I was never on MySpace, but I was on Facebook and I felt like that was kind of the same thing where Facebook had kind of an age thing but people might have lied about when their birthday was.

Missy 7:26
Yeah, and that’s the thing like anyone

Anna 7:28
save their butts. And I can say that on here?

Pat 7:31
Yeah.

Missy 7:40
I think the cool thing too about tech talk and maybe this is just because I’m kind of a creeper is it’s like an inside look into like the gen Z’s world. Yeah, you can like see all these things and like I’ve learned about trends and we even had like we had someone we’re talking about with Tick Tock and little bit and just like learning about different like So

Pat 8:01
it’s changed language like-

Anna 8:04
Visco girls!

Pat 8:05
to this girl named Izzy, who has a viral video through tik tok. And she threw out words that I didn’t even know were words. And she did a good job of explaining them to us. And so I feel much more hip now. And the fact that I used the word hip much. But yeah, it’s just I mean, I’m sure that happened with Facebook. And I mean that the term hashtag was wasn’t a thing until, you know, Twitter picked it up and made it a thing. So that’s happened before, but I was always young enough to be on the cutting edge of it, and now I just feel old.

Missy 8:38
The other thing I think getting into like, so we’ve talked about, like what Tik Toc is, but how can marketers use it? We’ve actually launched a couple Tick Tock campaigns with some of our clients. So and you want to talk a bit more about what that all entailed?

Anna 8:50
Yeah, so one of our clients is a mall and we were kind of trying to figure out how we can get that younger demographic in the mall. Actually, physically And one of them was we found that a lot of people were actually Tik-Tocing while in the mall. And so we were like, Okay, well, I never thought I’d see the day that we would pitch Tik-Tocing to people. Um, but it’s been super fun. We’ve used a brand ambassador and who’s a dancer so it keeps it even more fun because that’s what a lot of them are, too are people doing dances? And then of course for the holidays, doing different stores, the turning Mariah Carey songs. Yeah, it’s fun, but there are a lot of work to make it takes hours.

Missy 9:37
That’s what like what some of these videos people will post like don’t let this flop this took me two days to find it. It’s like, Oh my gosh, like just the work that they have put into this stuff. I

Anna 9:47
mean that energy of like, and then what if it does flop?

Pat 9:51
They’re short videos too. So put spending two days to put it together for a short video right? It’s not like it 10 minute video for Facebook or YouTube or something?

Missy 10:02
It depends. So I follow like a lot of like artists account so they’ll show like actually like maybe building something or like yeah, painting that might take 48 hours to do. They’ll speed up really quickly so you just see the beginning and the end of the painting. Yeah, so it’s more products like that that are there

Anna 10:16
was one guy yesterday I was watching he did it to a song that named the days of the week. And so each day he took a video of him at work and he was like a doctor or something. And I was like he’s another he said he’s like this took me a week to make Don’t let it flop or whatever.

Missy 10:31
what I’ve noticed and maybe this is just because it’s targeting me I’m not sure what’s going on here. I get a lot of plastic surgeons that are on Tick Tock. Have you seen that? No. Yeah, there’s all these doctors and they’ll have like, there was a few plastic surgeons and they give you like tips on like, oh, like celebrities have had plastic surgery and just different things like that. Because one of the trends right now which and this gets you into the Gen Z world is hashtag nose job check. Oh people who get nose jobs and stuff. I have not been a doctor. met their process on Tic Tok. It’s really it’s a strange world but this is

Anna 11:05
fun because then I always read the comments on some who do like famous or famous celebrity famous relative check yes famous relative check, and then they do Oh gosh, oh, they do it like a weight loss check or something else. And then they I read the comments and some of them will be like, that’s not even true. You just did this your last video and I’m like, Ooh, I like that. that’s I live for.

Missy 11:31
the other thing that’s crazy too Is anyone who goes on Tic Tok you’ll notice a couple people that are constantly on everyone’s feeds because they’re like the Tic Tok influencers a girl named Charlie is one of them and Ali’s another one and what’s crazy and what’s it I think kids they’re just think so, so fast and put this together is they created a tipped a Tic Tok hype house, which essentially these tech tech influencers go to It’s in LA. And their main goal is just create crazy amounts of videos and content for Tic Tok. And if you if anyone follows like the makeup community like James Charles goes there and he’s been featured in videos with these Tic Tok influencers. And they’re basically trying to use their influence of influence of power together to do cut like combo videos with each of them and each and each of them. So it’s been really interesting to see how they’re using that to build

Pat 12:27
so tik tok set up the hype house?

Missy 12:29
oh, just a Tic Tok kid. Like I want to rent this room, a bunch of tech talkers. Let’s get together and let’s make it and let’s beat this algorithm and keep it running and make us move to the top. And that’s cool hype house. Wow. It launched in, they start talking about it in November. It launched in December and they started moving out there. And a couple of the girls cuz a lot of them are under the age of 18. We’ll fly back and forth to bypass on weekends to record videos.

Anna 12:56
Well, Pat, what do you do with your free time?

Izzy 12:59
What were you doing when you were I’m

Pat 13:01
not flying back and forth to LA creating videos that’s for sure.

Missy 13:05
Yeah, it’s just amazing Gosh, um Tic Tok is also released Tic Tok advertising that brands can be you know, just like any other platform go in and hyper target the areas they want to focus on and target them. But it’s only two specific brands right now. Like I think HBO is a partner the really big ones. But I know that in the next few months are talking about releasing that to more brands. So if you are business and you’re trying to reach that younger audience Tic Tok advertising can be really effective for that.

Pat 13:34
So since you can’t get like traditional ads, or most brands can’t get traditional ads or any ad on Tic Tok, what are we doing for our mall client? Is Is it the mall clients social or Tick Tock account that we’re posting on?

Anna 13:48
Yes. Or is it utilizing like influencers to kind of get that reach and then having them reported on their Tic Tok accounts and then kind of trying to get noticed that way? Because that’s what’s the hard part. It’s like, oh well how can we, you know, it’s not like Facebook or Instagram where you can just place an ad. And some of the ads are like super intricate it’s like a whole new video. It’s like a TV commercial that they do for some of the ads and I’m like, Okay Pat get to work.

Pat 14:16
Is that part of the reason why Tick Tock is so big right now? because there aren’t ads on it?

Anna 14:21
I think so. I think so too. That’s why I’m a little nervous for it to get super ad heavy because you never know.

Missy 14:30
yeah, they’ll eventually try to monetize it, obviously just like every other platform but I do think that one I think it’s really fun how it’s like integrated and that short Yeah, that show it it’s like it’s a cool new it’s like how Facebook was back in my day. Facebook was like the cool thing and you know, now we’re on it yet and now it’s just become part of my daily life. But I don’t Tic Tok gonna be like that for

Pat 14:52
for these kids. It kind of reminds me of vine, the way you’re describing. videos and stuff. Yeah, and vines no longer a thing. So Tech Talk is just the new vine basically,

Missy 15:02
kind of I think it’s a good mixture of like vine and musically would probably be the best way because they’re combining like the music and everything. I wasn’t a big vine user though, either.

Anna 15:09
Oh, I loved it. It was so fun.

Missy 15:12
When did it Why did it go away?

Anna 15:15
I thought it just I think it flopped. I

Pat 15:17
think it nobody just nobody used it enough anymore. And so

Anna 15:21
maybe think about it, it probably didn’t make any money. So probably didn’t I don’t remember it having ads or anything?

Pat 15:26
I don’t think so. I think once Snapchat and Instagram Stories came along that kind of stole the thunder from vine.

Anna 15:33
Yeah, well, I got an article in my email today saying that Snapchat and tick tock are both reportedly working on new deep fake type features, which I know Snapchat just rolled out with like new features. So you can just it’s like those, those musical elves that you can do around, but I don’t know what that’s called. Oh, yeah. Around the

Pat 15:54
holiday. Talking about you put your face on it. Oh, yeah,

Anna 15:57
yeah. And so something like that. But the Snapchat ones are so real, that now Tick Tock and snapchat are kind of supposed to be I mean, that’s the the new mainstream thing in 2020. That’s supposed to. I mean, I’m just here trying to be hip. But, um, I don’t know, it’s just super interesting to see how all the features that tik tok will come out with because they’re obviously going against Snapchat. And now Instagram Stories are trying to keep up with the times but Instagram stories, I don’t really. I don’t really post about them.

Missy 16:35
I’m huge on Instagram stories, but I think just depends on the person.

Anna 16:38
Yeah, I mean, I’ll sit there and watch everybody’s, but I don’t know. I might take that. It’s just funny. It’s like a feel good thing or you’re not like, I feel like sometimes you get sucked into everyone’s business on Instagram, and then Tick Tock. You’re just like, oh my god. I don’t even know this person, but that’s hilarious.

Missy 16:53
I feel like the best way to describe it is like Instagram is a lot more curated content and tick tock is a lot more like off the cuff like you’re not seeing that. Someone who’s done like a full glam makeup. Perfect pose background. It’s like I’m sitting in my dark room dancing being a total weirdo. And that’s my tech talk video. Yeah seems a lot more like natural and organic, which I think social media needs a little bit more up. Well, that’ll be interesting to once ads start popping up on Tick tock, because I’ve now reduced add in that environment is going to look very weird.

Yeah, yes, hundred percent. There’s also I just saw this article that was posted 22 hours ago, that tik tok has silently partnered with Google.

Anna 17:31
So it says that why There’s more Android users?

Missy 17:34
I’m not sure that they might be but one thing that did you do this pat? Did you have this happen?

So one thing that they are doing is because what’s really interesting about this is when you like when we interviewed Izzy, when you search her, typically when you search someone’s account, you can see it but you can’t see everything because you have to be logged into the app when we search our account. You See everything through the Google platform.

Pat 18:02
So you don’t have to have the tick tock app to see people’s content.

Missy 18:04
Correct. So is that because of that, and this partnership with Google, if you have a tick tock account, and you’re posting content that’s using specific hashtags, keywords, things like that, it helps with your SEO for ranking Open

Pat 18:19
Google searches up. Wow.

Anna 18:23
So that’s a lot.

Missy 18:24
So if you search any popular person into Google, you’ll see their knowledge panel, and within that panel, you’ll see all the social icons, so there’s all these things, the tick tock influencers that helps to. what else…

Pat 18:36
that changes so much with privacy and stuff though, too, because Facebook or Instagram, you have to be logged in to get all that stuff. But now that that’s just like public data and information.

Missy 18:46
I’ll link to the article in the show notes. But there’s a whole Yeah, article about the partnership, which that’s a whole nother thing to think about. from an SEO perspective, SEO already freaks me out.

Anna 19:01
Yeah, oh my gosh. I know one of my homework assignments tonight is to go through Tick Tock for our clients and figure out which ones are going to be like great to do in the mall and things and so I’m just like, headphones in and I’ll be I’ll see if I

Missy 19:17
market research- Yes!

Anna 19:19
yes. I know my fiance was like, I wish I got paid to be on Tic Tok. You snooze, you lose.

Missy 19:27
The other thing too, that I’ve seen a bunch of articles around is can you get famous on Tic Tok and essentially you can but the biggest thing because because the app so new, like Instagram is really hard to be an influencer because it’s been around for a while there’s all these people who are way ahead of you. But with Tic Tok because the algorithm hasn’t I’ll say been as active as like a Facebook and Instagram yet. It’s really easy to get your videos featured And Izzy actually gives us some really good tips. Yeah, and the next part of this episode, that We’ll share on how to beat the tick tock algorithm. Yep, and get to the front page. So I’m really excited to jump into that part to

Anna 20:07
the so interesting like, people are googling that and like spending their time where we would be like how to post a good photo on Instagram and they’re like how to be Tic Tok famous. How to beat Tic Tok how to beat the Chinese government.

Pat 20:24
That’s the title of our episode.

Missy 20:26
That a clickbait. Most download episode done. The last thing I want to touch on is the Tic Tok challenges. Oh, yes, because the One really cool night that they did was hashtag create for a cause where people create specific Tic Tok videos and then there can be a donation component to it for the for nonprofits. But then there’s on top of that, there’s tons of other ones, too. I’m trying to think of like my

Anna 20:58
brother and I did one that were You actually had to have strength to do this, but we tried where you’re like, one, it’s kind of like, You’re like a tabletop pose. That’s like, my brother put his feet up and I like, put down and then you both were like kind of floating.

Okay.

Pat 21:20
I want to see this.

Anna 21:22
You have to see it.

It took us like an hour though to make at Thanksgiving and it was like a workout of the first battle.

Missy 21:32
The crew for a cause one invited craters to help raise funds for do something.org Best Friends Animal Society. They ended up with $2 million in donations. And then obviously the it was great for brand awareness of all those as well.

Pat 21:46
Is that an ongoing campaign or is that just a short term focus?

Missy 21:51
so basically, they’re having these creators create cool content and it’s the other thing too is if you are ever feeling stuck or in a rut with like, what did you Create creatively with any campaign. Tic Tok is like just such good inspiration. Because people think of things you wouldn’t even think about. Like the plastic surgeons or you know, things that aren’t even that should have no business being on Tic Tok and you’re like, Wow, that’s really freaking clever. That totally makes sense why you’re on Tic Tok for that. So I would highly recommend if you’re listening and you’re like, you still understand what the heck we’re talking about. Just download the app because you can’t explain it until you see it visually.

Anna 22:28
Or that cheer challenge that people did. So like men. Men aren’t able to do this pat.

Pat 22:35
Oh, were you like bend over you lift up? I didn’t try. It was a Tic Tok thing, but I’ve played that game before and you’re right. I can’t do it

Anna 22:44
Yea it’s weird

Missy 22:46
tributed right. Yeah. men versus women.

Anna 22:49
The future as women.

Missy 22:53
We can look chairs.

Pat 22:56
Can’t argue with

Anna 23:00
So I like are some challenges and this is why social media can be used for the good. And not just all the negative because they can use it for nonprofits and stuff. Yeah. Love it.

Missy 23:10
So in this next part episode, we are going to chat with Izzy, who became tik tok famous and she’s from Minnesota for getting the perfect ACTscore.

Pat 23:20
Yea she’s one smart cookie. That’s for sure.

Missy 23:22
She’s amazing what that’s like. And so she basically create a tic tac account that gives tips on how to be a better test taker. Yep. And she’s also a tutor, which is a whole other thing. She is just amazing. So we dove into really like her teenage Gen Z mind on how she beat the algorithm, how she came up with content, how she got Tic Tok famous. And it was so funny because in certain parts of this episode, she’s like, she’ll be at like something for school. And so like, Wait, is that the tick tock or the aect girl from Tick Tock. She’s like yeah, that’s me

So we’ll dive into all that and more about the hype house as well.

Izzy 23:57
All right. Hi, my name is Izzy. I’m senior in high school, and I am a tutor I tutor kids in a variety of subjects. Kids can be as young as like, I work with a third grader and then I work with a few high schoolers as well.

Missy 24:13
And you posted this video on Tik Toc that has gone pretty much viral. Tell me how Tell me more about the video describe it to me, we’ll post a link to it as well, but so the audience can hear about it.

Izzy 24:25
Yeah, so the video was talking about how I got a perfect score my ACT

Missy 24:31
Which congrats That’s amazing.

Izzy 24:35
Thank you. Yeah. So I was talking about that and tricks that I use that weren’t necessarily study tips, but more about how to work with the test to improve your score. Not necessarily by learning more material, but knowing about how the test is structured and how to use it to the best of your advantage.

Missy 25:00
Just ACT hack. Yeah.

Pat 25:03
Love it. Was this all after you got the perfect score? Did you? Did you post anything leading up to taking ACT or anything?

Unknown Speaker 25:10
No. So I got that score in April. And I didn’t join Tic Tok until around like June. And then I didn’t. I probably didn’t start posting until August and then this one went viral in September. So what made you like 2019?

Missy 25:26
What made you decide to create that tik tok video?

Izzy 25:30
So, it’s actually kind of funny. I saw a video of someone like so people will do stuff that like, it’s kind of weird, but though there’s this thing called like, inspect element, and people will like make joking videos about like, Oh, I got a 36 on my ECP and there were a bunch of people in the comments. And they’re like, what? That doesn’t look right. And then I was like, Yeah, I know you can do at it. So like, you’ve been Your video showed next to theirs. And then I showed mine and I was like, do you see how it says that? It says that you, when you don’t get like a really high score, it says you can still improve these skills. And I was like, look at the scores. That’s not what it looks like. And then I posted as like a tweet from my school district about it as like more proof. And like videos like that are pretty common. Like not like exposing people but just showing. Like, like, this is cap, which is like slang for lying. Yeah, so it’s kind of like, I don’t know, everyone just jokes around with that. So then people were in the comments like, how did you do that? And I was like, all right, well, I can like I tutor kids. Like I can just make a video posting my best tips and like, so my Tik Tocing has kind of gone from exposing people to helping people which I think is pretty funny.

Missy 26:55
Like, plan out the idea or did you just like I’m just gonna hit record and some hacks and go from there.

Unknown Speaker 27:02
Yeah, I just decided to I did each category and I was like I’m just gonna list as many easy tips as I can in 60 seconds.

Missy 27:13
So So and then what made you post it on Tic Tok versus like Instagram or Snapchat you’d mentioned that like to do at thing kind of inspired you for Tic Tok.

Izzy 27:21
Yeah, so with Tick tock, your videos are really easily seen by people who don’t directly follow you. There’s a feature called the for you page where I don’t know when it starts. But after you’ve posted a few videos, your videos start getting sent to the for you page to about 40 different people’s feeds. And if they like watch your video all the way through like it, comments on it or share it, it gets boosted to more people’s pages. So the main way people get popular on there, like other people watching it. So it’s a lot easier to reach bigger audiences by creating engaging content.

Pat 27:56
So how many people have watched your ACT video so far?

Unknown Speaker 28:01
Yeah, so it’s a 1.6 million.

Pat 28:03
Oh, wow.

Missy 28:04
Just a casual 1.6 no big deal.

Pat 28:08
Have you been recognized outside of Tik Toc, by anybody? Really? Yeah.

Izzy 28:18
Yeah, I was at a Quiz Bowl competition and you see you sit right across from the team, or the other team and the key was like, You look really familiar. Do I know you from somewhere and of course, my teammates gonna love to give me crap for my tik tok just because it’s like, some it’s funny. And they’re like, she’s viral on Tick Tock. He’s like, Are you the tick tock ACT girl? Yeah. And then I work as a receptionist at a Tennis Center and we do you tournaments a lot and a lot of times of high schoolers. And one time this girl came up to me She’s like, or do you make tik tok videos about the ACC and I was like, maybe it’s kind of fun. When I get recognized because like it for me tic tok is just like social media I don’t like I say like, Oh, my video got 1.6 million views, but it’s hard for me to picture in my head, like 1.6 million people watching it. So when I like, not when I’m out, like, not necessarily confronted with it, but when I faced like people who recognize me who I don’t know, it’s kind of just like, Oh, well, man, this is big. This is big.

Pat 29:27
Is it? Yeah. Is that something you want to do more of is create content that a lot of a lot of people see or is it really just something you’re doing for fun for right now?

Izzy 29:36
It’s something that I’m doing for fun right now. I’ve always really liked helping people with academic stuff in school, how I feel like I grade all my friends. And I grant I proofread on my friends papers, and one of them was like, why do you do this? And I’m like, because I like helping people. And it’s fun for me. And I think right now, that’s kind of my motivation for it. And like, I’ll get DMS on Instagram and it’s like, I watched your Tick Tock Your videos help me bring my score up three points, which helped qualify me for a scholarship. And I’m like, Oh my gosh, like, like someone got like a $6,000 scholarship because of me and I’m like, dang, I’m like, really changing people’s lives here, at least Well, part of their lives, not their entire life.

Missy 30:18
So if someone were like wanting to be like, tick tock famous, let’s say I’m like trying to be trying to be a tick tock star here. What do I have to do just hashtag the for you page to get on it or you’re just or just post constant content consistently.

Unknown Speaker 30:32
I am not sure if like the hashtag for you page thing works. I know a lot of people do that. But I mean, I never ever looked at hashtags. I only really look at my for page. So a lot of people have tried using that hashtag. And I’m not necessarily sure if that boost your chances of getting on the for you page bit. Because like I said, the content only goes to like 40 people stages and then if they like it, then it goes to more people. So the biggest thing for like getting viral on Tick Tock is creating content that people want to see. And sometimes it’s just getting lucky like, are the 40 people my video gets sent to going to enjoy this like funny video or because there are a lot of different kinds of things you can make on the platform. So like if you do a dance video, are the people going to be interested in watching you dance for 15 seconds? Or like, are they going to like this video of you making brownies for your cousins? So I would say that if you’re trying to get viral on Tick Tock just trying out different things and finding a niche Yeah.

Pat 31:41
Have you have you had success with any other videos that you’ve posted? Big time like that?

Unknown Speaker 31:44
Yeah. Not none that have reached the million views like the other one, but that video kind of started me on making more and more videos about the ACT and I’ve started working with like advanced placement classes now to. I posted one of my first AP videos a few days ago and that one’s been doing pretty well. But so one thing about Tic Tok is that when your video that’s on there for you page you might not necessarily gain a lot of followers from it. But because I make it clear in the videos that I post more content like that on my page, I have a really high follow engagement from my content on the for you page. So a lot of people will have like 5 Million Likes, but like 40,000 followers, and I’m at around 500,000 likes, but I have I think this morning I got like 30,000 so it’s

Izzy 32:40
with my content I get more followers from that and that and then having more followers that also means that more people will see your stuff which sends your stuff to the for you page more so smart. That has certainly helped

Pat 32:54
look at you game in the system.

Missy 32:56
Do you think that brand should be on Tick Tock and if so would you follow them

Izzy 33:01
It’s, that’s an interesting question, because so part of me, like enjoy seeing branded content, but then part of me is like, I also just like watching other young kids making funny content. And like, there’s kind of a discussion that people are posting videos about right now. It’s like, Oh, we missed the old tic tok were, like audio, we’re trending instead of people and celebrities weren’t on the app. So I think it would really just depend on the brand and how they’re using it. And maybe if the brand were to incorporate themselves in their image into trends on the app, rather than just putting their stuff on there and kind of changing the culture because I think a lot of people are kind of noticing that happening and becoming. I don’t know how to really phrase it but getting smart not enjoying the trillions. Yeah.

Missy 33:58
So what do you I want to ask You are you familiar with like the hype houses and all that stuff?

Unknown Speaker 34:02
Oh, the hype house Yeah.

Missy 34:04
you what are your thoughts on that? Do you think that contents kind of like fake because they’re like purposely creating it for a reason or what are your What do you think? What’s your thoughts?

Izzy 34:13
Well, one of my biggest issues with the hype house is there is a really big lack of diversity with it. And I’m someone who likes to see a wide variety of content from different people and it’s I knew like three of the people in the hype house when it when I first started seeing those videos and like, I mean, if these people have built and developed their following that makes sense to teach for them to like, collaborate with each other on videos, but I think a lot of people kind of see it as something fake so I have mixed feelings about it.

Missy 34:52
Awesome. Thank you so much. Thank you. All links we talked about in today’s podcast will be the show notes at social podcast.com/EP101. Make sure you subscribe to the social feed podcast with Apple podcasts or your favorite podcast player to get a brand new episode delivered right to every Wednesday. Don’t forget about our Facebook group. We’d love to get your feedback. Tell us more about Tic Tok what you thought of the episode. You can search that when you go to Facebook and just search for the social feed podcast and click to join. Thank you for listening and we’ll be back next week.

Announcer 35:23
The social feed is a production of Hubbard Interactive with music provided by a Minneapolis based artist john atwell.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai


On This Episode

Missy Young

Social Media Services Manager

@miss_shredbetty Missy Young

As the Social Media Services Manager for Hubbard Interactive, Missy Young’s position entails working with clients and team members to drive social media strategy and lead initiatives to identify new technologies and digital best practices. She develops customized micro and macro campaigns that drive online interaction, promotes and creates content that enhances the customer experience and creates lead generation for medium to large-scale companies. She regularly speaks at local and national events on a variety of subjects including: social media, PR, analytics and content strategy.


Anna Johnson

Social Media Coordinator

@the_butterflypath Anna Johnson

A recent college grad (University of Wisconsin-River Falls) in marketing communications with a minor in business communications, Anna Johnson started her own brand called Just Anna. She also branded her non-profit, The Butterfly Path, that launch this past November where she helps others in her community with mental health. If Anna’s not at work, talking social media, or helping others brand their business, she can be found drinking endless cups of coffee or shopping at local businesses.


Pat Laeger

Videographer/Producer

@PatLaeger Pat Laeger

As the Videographer for Hubbard Interactive, Pat produces videos for the Twin Cities Hubbard Radio stations that range from event recaps to social video promos. He also produces an array of videos for sales clients – from testimonial videos to product how-to videos; from spotlight interview videos to animated infographic videos. He loves to tell stories – big or small. He has two dogs named #OakleyRembrandt and #GemmaWatson (check out their hashtags on Instagram!).


Izzy Lundquist

Izzy is a high school senior in Minnesota. She also tutors other students as they prepare for the ACT. Her video on “How to get a perfect score on the ACT” went viral on TikTok.


To celebrate our 100th episode, we hosted a show at our Hubbard Digital Academy and looked back at how social media and digital marketing has changed in the 3 years we’ve had our podcast.


Shownotes


Episode Transcript

Missy 0:00
Welcome to the social feed podcast. I’m your host missy. Thank you for listening. This is our 100th episode.Pat 0:08
Audience with us today. We’re at we’re at our Hubbard digital Academy recording live on stage during lunchtime. And so everyone else is stuffing their faces. And we just get to watch them eat. hungry.

Jayna 0:22
We have some popcorn up here.

Pat 0:25
We’re celebrating 100 episodes. I mean, what three little over three years ago, we started this thing. It was kind of a, hey, let’s just have some fun and do a podcast. And here we are successful hundred episodes later. We’ve come so far we have. So I think today we just want to talk about what’s changed in three years and go back through some of our early episodes. And talk about what’s changed since then, because we talked about some weird stuff at the beginning. I mean, we still talk about weird stuff. I mean, our last episode was on meth, so But I mean the very first episode of is September 2016. And what what was our first topic that we kicked off?

Missy 1:08
Okay, I have to read the title of this the Pokemon GO craze, Instagram stories and the Olympic lockdown which does anyone here still play Pokemon Go? I never did one year when I was like No, it’s not really.

Pat 1:24
Yeah it was for like a month or two it was gigantic and so we’re like let’s talk about it.

Ruth 1:31
Was that like the new Tick Tock?

Missy 1:34
Tick Tock is like the cool new thing now. Well, it’s so funny too, because we have Instagram stories in our first episode and now Instagram Stories are just like there every day. Yeah, your

Pat 1:45
Yeah that was like the beginning of Instagram stories. I think they had just come out, like month or so before we started this and we’re like, are they gonna be gonna be a thing because at that point, Snapchat was still the only one doing stories like that and So you’re like well as Instagram gonna take over are they gonna do well or is Snapchat gonna you know and as we found out over three years Snapchat still there but Instagram Stories definitely.

Missy 2:11
They definitely. Yeah yeah Instagrams King now, yeah. Another episode, which I thought was so funny is why influencer marketing is the next big thing.

Pat 2:23
We were right.

Jayna 2:25
We’re on the cusp of right thing. Yeah.

Missy 2:29
Which is so funny because Megan, you’re actually teaching today at Hubbard Digital Academy about influencer marketing.

Meghan 2:33
Yeah. timely. So the presentation probably looks a little different than what you guys talked about back in What 2016? Was that what it was?

Do you remember how you talked about influencer marketing three years ago?

Missy 2:45
I think it was very much like just this is something you can do like some brands are starting to use it but it was it was nothing like it is today. Like Tell me a few things like your presentation today. Well, for example, it’s new for our presentation today based on what I presented on it. June is that Instagram is starting to remove likes. So that’s definitely going to change the whole scope of Instagram of influencer marketing now. So, I mean, who knows what’s going to happen there, but I know for sure that influencers are going to be focusing more on organic quality content, since they can’t use likes as a selling point to brands anymore. So brands now are going to evaluate based on what their content looks like and the conversations around their content.

Meghan 3:24
It’s crazy just to think about how much and influencer marketing is blown up. Like you

Ruth 3:29
You know what I know about their presentation is that Farrah Fawcett isn’t Nike. The OG- yeah. It’s it’s amazing that really, influencers have always been a thing. It’s just the way that it gets presented is so different. Yeah. Yeah. I was brilliant to put her in there. Well, again, I know who she

Meghan 3:55
Well, it’s funny as Ruth and I were talking a week ago to about influencer marketing, just talking about my presentation and she’s like, honestly, influencers exist in the high school like the cool kid wearing the brand new jeans, you know, it’s been around for a really long time. It’s not just an Instagram thing. However, Instagram has blown it up like crazy influencers can make a lot of money doing this. It’s could be their full time job now, it’s just grown so much

Ruth 4:20
Well, and I think what’s cool about it is that a local business has access to an influencer. Now. You know, nobody had Nikes budget, you know, right, Farrah Fawcett to be their influencer. But now that’s more accessible than it ever has been. So that yeah, that’s so cool.

Meghan 4:36
Well, more customizable to I mean, even even thinking about, I mean, we’re at Hubbard broadcasting, radio endorsements have been basically influencers for radio personalities have been influencers for a long time, but that’s still more along the lines of a big brand sort of thing that you’ve got to be able to spend money to advertise on the radio and pay a talent to talk about your brand and stuff and it’s it’s worked but now social media has made it much more affordable for small businesses and there are just so many more influencers out there in specific niches where you don’t have to hope you get some traction based on big gigantic radio or movie star x.

Missy 5:15
Just gonna say that about the niche audiences that influencer marketing brings, you know, you have like, go after gamers you can go after the like the foodies, the stylist, like there’s so many areas. And that’s the cool thing about social media influencers.

Meghan 5:26
Yeah, and honestly I include this in my presentation too, but an influencer can be anyone. I even say it could be your neighbor because for example, I am just a regular old person on social media and I actually got reached out to a partnership for a brand recently. I’m not an influencer I don’t call myself an influencer, but I think

Pat 5:44
Wow I didn’t know we were talking to a celebrity right now

Meghan 5:45
famous, I’m just trying to say that but no, I’m just a normal person. And now brands are really starting to tap into that because I have friends and I can talk to my friends. So I think that it’s changing even more like that these nano influencers are really growing.

That’s interesting that you took that Instagrams taking away likes because one of the first episodes we did Episode Four I think it was was on social media stats and and measuring social media. Like how is that changed like even for us as an agency how has that changed in three years? Oh my god, how are we measuring stats three years ago?

Missy 6:24
We were probably using like Sprout Social or some tool to measure all of that and now it’s really like all the platforms like think about even Facebook like the data the reporting dashboard and just Facebook alone How much that’s changed over the past three years and Instagram reporting and now we’re moving likes and oh, man, it’s it’s come a long way.

Meghan 6:43
Yeah, what’s funny about Instagram removing likes to is that I think it’s, it’s removing the vanity aspect of Instagram yet, for people that have huge following that gets thousands and thousands of likes, doesn’t it now say like so and so liked it and thousands others or something Like that, and if you have less than however many likes, it just says so and so liked it and others liked it. So like, there’s still a separation of this person super, super popular and this person doesn’t have that many likes, you know?

Missy 7:12
And I’m kind of curious, like, why Instagram is going that route. I was wondering what we think they’re going to be coming up, because there’s no way they’re just gonna take the notes. Yeah. And I’ve always like, we’ve talked about this in past episodes, but will platforms eventually start to charge to use social media. I mean, that’s always in the back of your head, especially businesses like to have a business account. So as every time they do something, I’m like, are they gonna start now? I don’t think they will. But it’s always in the back of my head.

Meghan 7:41
It’s Yeah, I mean, there’s a reason that they’re doing it. Oh, yeah, they’re there I’m sure part of it is is the all the backlash on mental health and what you know what that like stuff does to our brains and everything, but there’s, there’s no reason that’s the only way the only reason for them taking it away. There’s gotta be something. They’ve gotta have something

Ruth 8:00
Yeah, like, just

Unknown Speaker 8:02
like it was just thinking

Ruth 8:05
back.

Missy 8:09
It’s funny too, because we actually did a social feed podcast episode on mental health and social media with adrionna. Just talking about how you know, taking a break from your phone, especially working in social media every day. It’s it’s a lot, I mean, just socially in general is a lot. So working in it is a whole other level. So we had a whole episode about that. But I thought that was really fun. And that’s actually one of our top downloaded episodes to the podcast.

Meghan 8:31
Another one of our big episodes was we did a panel discussion earlier today at HDA was turning your location into a destination and just talking about and it was probably different a couple years ago when we did that episode than it even is today. But talking about what it takes to make people want to come to a retail store. And as digital becomes more and more entrenched in what we do, and we don’t leave our house to shop hardly ever, hardly ever. Like what do you do to make people want to come see you and going back to Instagram it’s make a lot one of the big things is making your store or location visually appealing so people want to take pictures and you know they can can wander lands of the world we had Karen Bachman from Bachmann’s here today and Wolfington was here. And then Rosedale center. Yeah, talking about what they’ve done to make people want to shop at them all and come by their flowers at a at a store and you know,

Missy 9:30
creating that more experiential destination versus just I’m gonna pop in and grab something like whats going to a draw people to come in versus ordering online. You know, if you don’t create it make something cool, then why would I just order it online? Right? Yep. So Pat episode six was using video and where it fits in your social media plan. Has video changed over the past three years

Meghan 9:51
that’s pretty much exactly my presentation that I’m giving. But in 2016, I think At that point, Instagram had just introduced video onto their platform like, up until to 2015 or early 2016. It was just photos on Instagram. And that seems weird to think about now because there are videos all over the place, and video ads on Instagram. But at that point of video was a video and you would just record a video and post it everywhere like you’d put it on your Facebook page, you put it on, if you had a YouTube channel, you’d put the same video everywhere. And I think the biggest thing that we’ve learned in you know, three years of social media video is that everything has to be customized to where you’re publishing the video. If you’re publishing a video on Facebook, it’s got to be different than a video you’re putting on YouTube, or a TrueView ad campaign that you’re doing. The video needs to be structured completely different, let alone if you’re filming it vertically for Instagram stories or you’re making a square version for Facebook or Instagram, right. There’s just there are so many places that videos can go. And same thing with influencers. It’s so, so much more cost effective to do a video advertisement than it was three years ago five years ago. You can production companies aren’t charging as much because there’s it’s easier access to the equipment that you need to make a video businesses can make their own videos, or

Ruth 11:20
And with the technology of a phone for sure can. I mean,

Meghan 11:24
can you imagine doing a video from your phone three years ago? publishing that as a as an ad? I mean, sure, you could post it on Facebook to your profile, right? But no way but you could easily do I mean, Apple does this their shot on iPhone TV commercials where they’re filming like, it looks like a movie scene like I just saw one the other day It looks like it’s like a paint ball. Oh, it’s a snowball fight. Yeah, there’s all these crazy action shots and cinematic movements of cameras and actors and everything and if they didn’t say shot on iPhone on it, you would have no idea

Wow Yeah, there’s so many tools out there now to and just your accessibility to all these things with your phone in general it makes things things can be done a lot easier than probably three years ago now. Oh for sure. Yeah.

Missy 12:15
My other question for you is because because there’s so many different ways you can now resize video like Instagram stories, Instagram feed, Facebook, YouTube, like, how much more time does it take from before like three years ago, like you make the video and you distribute on the channels that next that next set?

Meghan 12:31
I do, I wouldn’t say well, it’s, it’s it’s both faster and it’s more work now. Because now we can with with 4k cameras and even higher resolution cameras and 4k, you could really film once and then crop the size down to whatever network you’re you’re using. Because 4k is so big, you can crop it to vertical and still have it as big of resolution as Instagram stories will allow. So in that sense, you don’t have to necessarily film things multiple times. To get it on multiple channels, but at the same time, that is more editing to be done later, most likely, I’m not taking a video that we have filmed landscape and just cropping the middle out of it for because you’re going to miss some things. And so you’ve got to take into account where the camera moves where the actors move where the, you know, talent is. And so there’s a little bit more finessing of it to go on these multiple different platforms. But you can film it once, which is kind of nice. Yeah.

Missy 13:28
So one of our other most recent episodes, well, in the beginning, Episode 14 was everything you need to know about Google Analytics. So Ruth, how much has Google Analytics changed over the past three years?

Ruth 13:41
I mean, there’s so many additional things that you can track and learn about the audience that goes to your website, that it’s insane. And then there’s multiple additional things that are coming that are just in beta right now that, you know, it’s on one hand, it’s getting creepier and creepier. But from a marketing standpoint, the ability to really know your audience and be able to market to them specifically, like you were talking a minute ago about the niche audiences. We’re getting closer to being able to do that from a marketing standpoint to and only only market to people who like to travel, for example, or just, you know,

Missy 14:20
so another Episode Episode 12 we did was politics on social media, which

Ruth 14:24
I was wondering if you were gonna bring this one up

Missy 14:31
Obviously, that’s happened in the past three years on Facebook specifically, and oh my gosh, think about that with Mark Zuckerberg and court and all of that

Meghan 14:38
and Cambridge Analytica and all that that all happened in the last three years.

Ruth 14:43
That’s crazy. Yeah, that seems like a lifetime ago. Yeah, guys.

Missy 14:49
So I know I’m like now especially when you place ads on Facebook, if you have anything to do with a political affiliation, you have to mark yourself and be verified as that business account to place ads. And they had they have to be completely transparent. So Facebook has an entire section. I just talked about this in my presentation on Facebook advertising, Facebook ad library. You can see other pages and what ads they’re promoting. And they’re specifically a political tab. So you can see how much they’re spending on and what ads they’re using to promote it.

Ruth 15:20
I don’t know how I feel about that.

Meghan 15:22
As a competitor, that’s great. I mean, you can you can look at what other

Ruth 15:25
If I was the business owner though I’d be pretty concerned about that.

Meghan 15:29
Yeah, transparency. That’s what I’m trying to introduce more of it.

Missy 15:32
Yeah. Okay, another episode we recorded was how hashtags can make or break your brand. Do you guys still hashtags are just as relevant as they were three years ago.

Ruth 15:42
You guys probably do. I don’t really pay that much attention to them.

Meghan 15:45
I mean, we still use them on Instagram all the time. I mean, Facebook, not yet. But

Ruth 15:51
a lot of people that use them on Facebook to me, it’s just like, why would you like you don’t know what you’re doing. I didn’t want to say that, but Meghan I’m glad you did.

Missy 16:02
On Instagram is so relevant and I’m really curious, like, I want to go back and like listen to that full episode on what we talked about. But I mean, like, tick tock is like the new thing right now. And there. It’s all hashtag all using hashtags like it’s not hasn’t gone anywhere. So that’s kind of interesting. Now hashtags have stayed true. Through all three of those years.

Meghan 16:21
I mean, we have a hashtag for Hubbard digital Academy today. I mean, Hubbard Academy is our tag. It’s a great way. I mean, I remember using it early on, for like conferences and stuff that I couldn’t attend. I would just pull up Twitter, and read through hashtags of people going to the different sessions and quotes from presenters and stuff that other people attending the conference with post and, you know, it wasn’t just like being there, but you could still get a lot of the information from being there. You know, the bigger it is, the more tweets and stuff you have to comb through, but it’s a great way to an end for us Hubbard Academy. We’ll look we’ll look back later this week, and go and wonder. Wonder what people posted and how they felt about it. It’s a great way to recap stuff and we do it for influencers we do other events and stuff that we do. We create hashtags and ask people to use it so we can go back and look at how it did.

Missy 16:24
Yeah, yeah Say to like, since this is our 6th Hubbard digital Academy, we’ve definitely been better at finding those Instagram moments. So like, like even our the social media podcast today like we have confetti poppers, we have the hundred like gold balloons behind us. You know, it just having those things that people want to take photos of. I think in our first Academy, we noticed everyone was taking pictures of their name badges, because there was nothing else really sexy in the room. So now we have like our big Hubbard Digital Academy sign.

Meghan 17:41
My presentation was super

Missy 17:44
obvious. So I mean, just having you know, creating that really cool experiential space to get people to take photos of the event or business. Yep. One of our very top one of our top episodes was Episode 15 how to create an integrated marketing campaign. And we actually have a presentation today where they’re talking about how to create an integrated marketing campaign.

Meghan 18:07
It’s still a thing.

Missy 18:08
Do you guys think that that has changed a lot over the past three years?

Meghan 18:13
I would say Yeah. Just because of the amount of channels always changing. Yeah, there’s so many things that are new now that weren’t around at that point. But I would say it’s even more critical now than it was before just I heard Elizabeth Reese say on the panel earlier today that one of the things she’s been surprised to find out is that even her personal I mean, she’s a TV celebrity. So personal is a weird term, but her personal social media channels that have different audiences, like her Facebook audience isn’t the same as even her Instagram is so she’s gotten more comfortable posting the same or very similar content on Instagram and Facebook, where for a while, she was like, I can’t post the same thing in both places. But But the more

Ruth 18:57
people aren’t seeing them is what you’re saying. Yeah.

Meghan 18:59
The more channels that are the more that’s going to segment audiences and so you have when you’re doing a marketing campaign you have to be on all these channels even if it’s the same or very similar messaging with the same hashtag or with the same video or creative concepts you you have to reach a wide audience at this point yeah,

Missy 19:17
I think that goes back to what you talked about video to like we’re just gonna shoot a video you have to size it for all of the different areas that you need to go and so whatever creative you have, you have to make sure you think about what areas does that apply best to you whether that’s video content for I’m gonna keep bringing up Tik Tok because I’m so obsessed the right now. I’m like 15 years I you tweet that I know what is wrong.

Meghan 19:39
You tweeted how much you love tik tok?

Yeah, she did.

Ruth 19:42
Why am I so obsessed with this?

Missy 19:48
integrated marketing, personal brand, so I have

Ruth 19:50
I was thinking that like just video on its own in the last three years, we weren’t doing TrueView campaigns three years ago on YouTube. It’s crazy.

Meghan 20:03
How many ads you see?

Missy 20:08
Do you think it’s harder for marketers now to do integrated campaigns because there are so many options. I feel like it gets expensive. It’s like, Okay, well, I’m going to start on YouTube and then I’m gonna have you know, radio and TV and then my you know, tik tok. And it’s almost spread yourself too thin. I think it’s just having to be more educated than we’ve ever had to be before. Because really, not every platform is appropriate for every brand. So, and Monitoring, how, what am I getting out of this? You know?

Meghan 20:41
Yeah, knowing where your audience is. I mean, it puts more pressure on marketers to do more, but it’s also pushing us all to be better too. But yeah, it is more work. I’d say.

Missy 20:53
Okay, Jayna you have to come up here because you are on our second episode. I’m going to pull you into this right Now. So Jana Wilcox, which she was originally Anderson, she got married over the past three years. So that’s another life change. She was on our second episode the makings of a perfect social media contest. How much has contests changed with social media over the past three years

Jayna 21:18
a ton! I was actually joking about this earlier. Because I feel like we I had this as a podcast topic, we used to have it as a Hubbard digital Academy topic as well that I would speak on. And more recently, we’ve changed the way we sell it and how we leverage our radio stations and this so that’s really interesting to me. It’s still relevant and it’s still a thing. I think it’s switched a lot more to comment contests and Instagram and things like that. And absolutely, I think you can still run a sweepstakes that generates leads and things like that, but you’ve just had to think about it in a totally different way in the last three years. We sorry, Pat. Sorry, Pat. I just And I knew that I wanted to talk about this.

Missy 22:05
Okay, so we also did a podcast on podcasting, which I think is so funny. How is podcasting changed in the past three years? insane? Gosh, I mean, oh my gosh, it’s just exploding right now. Like, we actually have someone from pod mn here. And if you guys are from Minnesota listening, I would highly recommend checking that out downloading the app. And it basically combines all of the Minnesota podcasts ours is on there too- shameless plug. which is which is cool. Like you know, it’s basically pulled in Minnesota brands that are on podcasts

Jayna 22:38
Missy and I were in washington dc in the fall and one of our markets so DC, they created a podcast and we kind of we peel back the layers of what it took to create that podcast and what’s it called it 22 hours- American nightmare yeah matter mystery stuff. This will good. so good. Yeah. And they had such great success, but to look at everything that was put into it all the thought and the strategy behind it was really, really, really interesting. But even they said, you know, what they used to do with podcasting had totally changed and even what their success was then has now even evolved and really evolved as they continue to do more.

Missy 23:19
So I feel like that should be one of our future episodes is talking with them and DC about how they built that. That would be really amazing. Really interesting. on there. Yeah. Okay, so I’m just like reading through these episodes, and some of them I’m like, What were we like we did an ASMR podcast that was great, which so much crap for he can’t talk right now. So I’m totally going to like blast him. So it’s actually a lot of good downloads. It was one of our top for a while. Another one we had was the good nuggets, the bad PR and the ugly airways. What was that? What was know what that was, but it Sounds I’m sure you know. What’s an ugly airway? Pat, do you remember what ugly airway was shaking his head? No, it was a long time ago. Oh my gosh, these are just these are gold. It’s It’s weird. Like when I first started, I was very intimidated by it. Because talking into a microphone, it just seems so like, whew, official. You know, if I swear, yeah. And it’s been it’s been a journey over these hundred episodes. I feel like I’m just more casual with and you know, it’s, it’s not as intimidating. You just you just gotta do it. So if anyone wants to use like, I think I’m gonna start a podcast. Just frickin do it. Yeah, start. Because now we’re at 100 episodes, which I never thought we’d had a lot to do with it just pushing me like missy. We gotta get it on the schedule. Be consistent, have cool ideas, pulling awesome people like you guys that like have fun things to talk about. Just do it. Because you have all been on different episodes. Do you have any favorite episodes What you’ve done?

Jayna 24:35
I think for me just watching you guys, it’s almost become, you know, more creative or you look at different topics in a different way where you think, well, that could be a podcast episode and instead of I think before we always thinking, Okay, so what’s the new trend right now? The big like, changing Yeah. And now it’s like, hey, let’s talk about this campaign they ran in South Dakota that everyone else is talking about, and just join me as I’m yeah, like, whatever that is it. I feel like, yes, we still think about it, but it comes more organically to you guys, at least when I’m seeing the topics come out.

Missy 25:00
Yeah, I think that’s a really good point. Like, we’re not just focused on like, the big hot, new, exciting updates. It’s like, really what are those campaigns, getting into the details of them? And then also talking about, you know, weird stuff along the way.

Jayna 25:53
And I think it helps you guys just with your work, to looking at what’s out there and evaluating it and thinking, Oh, our work Could be on someone else’s podcast? Or how would we look at this? And I like that too. When you bring it back to you, well, this is what we would do instead or so being the thought leader.

Missy 26:08
What always amazed me. So I actually spoke on a panel about podcasting a couple months ago. And they talked about like your audience and how to cater the content to them. And one thing I thought was really interesting and Pat and I noticed we’ve done a few episodes were on Twitter, all of these students start tweeting about our episodes. And so I had tweeted back a couple of them be like, how did you find out about us? They’re not even from Minnesota. They’re like, all over the country. Teachers at different schools, like professors are having the students listen to our podcast episodes, and having to write like papers and talk about them. That’s so cool. I was like, that is I mean, you really made it.

Ruth 26:47
can we ask to see some of the papers?

Missy 26:54
we should!

Ruth 26:55
If it’s a critique I don’t want to see it.

Missy 27:01
But it’s just cool. Like, you know, thinking about this would be more for business owners but marketing professors teaching people how to do this is a whole era we never thought of yet because we didn’t learn about podcasting in school. No, that’s half the stuff. I didn’t learn about social media at all in school to be honest.

Ruth 27:19
You guys can’t even believe that can you kind of looked up at the ceiling?

Missy 27:33
So what do you guys think about so obviously, we’re into 100 more episodes. So we’ll be doing this in three more years for our 200th What should we What do you think are 200 episode will be about? You think we’ll be talking on the moon? Oh, my gosh, where’s the world going to be in three years? We will have just gotten back.

Jayna 27:52
I agree with you. I can’t look. One of our markets is now on the moon. out there.

Missy 28:09
I think influencer marketing will still be here. It’s just going to be transformed in a different way to be insane how that changes. Yeah, video content, it’s always gonna be you’re just gonna get more, I think, like things like Tick tock, we’ll we’ll look back into it.

Jayna 28:23
Oh my gosh, you remember when Tick Tock was just starting and when Missy tweeted about it, and I don’t know what it looks like, but it was

Ruth 28:34
What about artificial intelligence? So I think that’s gonna be talking a lot more about.

Missy 28:41
That’s gonna be huge. That would be a great future episode. I think it would we got to get into that a little bit more and just motivation and how that’s gonna work with your marketing in general. What kind of what platforms do you guys think won’t be around anymore? in three years?

Meghan 28:58
I don’t want to call me out right now because I don’t want to be wrong- that’s the thing.

Missy 29:07
are you thinking the big one? I think it has to be right now. No, I wasn’t gonna go that far. Oh, I think it’ll still be around. I think it’s going to be transport. Yeah, like they’re gonna have to figure out while a lot of regulation going on like way more than now.

Meghan 29:19
I was gonna say Snapchat. I don’t know. That’s what I yeah, I think Snapchat. Yeah, I know. Sorry.

Jayna 29:26
Those Gen Z. Is it Gen Z? Yeah, yeah. They’re still on it a lot. But it’s like their form. The way they communicate the way they do it is if you were they take a picture of their forehead and always send back and forth it’s so funny.

Ruth 29:42
Are they like screenshot something and then yeah, they just the facial expression that they send. That’s my question to you and you should know how to answer that. Yeah. Weird. And they do. Yeah, they know how to respond.

Jayna 29:54
Do you think it would go away or anything. It might be something in school, another language option you have like cursive writing

Spanish I’m in French I’m in Snapchat. That’s my prediction that right there will have Snapchat teachers who’s gonna teach ads?

Missy 30:19
Yeah, that’s a good point. Like the thing about the teachers like, yeah, they’re gonna be teaching this more in school. I mean, high school is already starting to teach social media.

Jayna 30:28
Did you bring up How? So? Brandon? From brandography is that his name? Okay. Brandon from Nairobi. Wait, are you talking with Jason or Jason Albert?Wow. Okay, so Jason from brandography. I’m sorry. He was saying that his good friend is a psychiatrist and a big topic right now is Tick Tock addiction. Yeah, it’s an addiction. Oh my gosh, they’re working was Because my dad was on it, yeah, but they’re like using artificial intelligence to predict what you want to see. So that’s how they’re getting these young people just literally addicted to it.

Missy 31:11
I wonder if there’s going to be like, like, you know, like, stop smoking campaigns is gonna be like, stop using social media. It isn’t probably

Ruth 31:19
I read an article from I don’t know who the author is, is terrible. I can’t quote it, but he did a study of your brain. And when you are when you post something, and then somebody likes it or responds to it, that same center in your brain that responds to heroin, lights up

Meghan 31:38
That’s insane.

Missy 31:39
I can’t argue with that. Because I def, you know.

Ruth 31:44
So let’s end on a serious, that’s heavy stuff. Hopefully.

Hey, you know, talk about the good, the bad and the ugly.

Missy 31:56
We’re covering all of it. Yep. Well, I’m So excited to see what our next hundred episodes bring. So everyone, thank you for listening and enjoying the ride for these past three years. Pat, This is nuts. I think we can accomplish 200 sooner than Yes, don’t you? Yeah. Oh, yeah, we’ll keep it consistent. Well, we’ll get there any parting words? Pat, how your journey has been on the social feed podcast?

Meghan 32:23
This has been a lot of fun. I mean, as a as a former radio producer getting getting to do a podcast is it’s my first love. I mean, I love video and everything but but being a part of this has been a lot of fun. And like, like Missy said earlier, it’s just it’s so not threatening. Yeah,

Ruth 32:40
it is really fun,

Meghan 32:42
easy and fun. And we started off wanting to talk to business owners. And I think we still speak mostly to business owners and marketers, but we’re just having fun and talking about stuff that we love and trying to make the world a better place. No, we don’t really care. Let’s try to end on a super positive note. No, but we’ll Link- I’ll try to remember all the episodes we talked about, and link to those. But yeah, just thanks for listening. For those of you who’ve been around if you’ve been around for an episode or 400 episodes, thanks for listening, and we’ll keep going. This isn’t this isn’t the end for sure.

Missy 33:23
And it will again, I always pitch this every time at the end of each episode, but check out our Facebook group, social feed podcasts and let us know if you want to any future episodes that you have ideas for. fresh new ideas. We have a lot of great brains in the building, but we can always use more so let us know what you think. You just got to join socially podcast on Facebook to join. Thank you guys for listening and we’ll be back soon. Bye bye.

Unknown Speaker 33:50
The social feed is a production of Hubbard Interactive with music provided by Minneapolis based artist john Atwell.


On This Episode

Missy Young

Social Media Services Manager

@miss_shredbetty Missy Young

As the Social Media Services Manager for Hubbard Interactive, Missy Young’s position entails working with clients and team members to drive social media strategy and lead initiatives to identify new technologies and digital best practices. She develops customized micro and macro campaigns that drive online interaction, promotes and creates content that enhances the customer experience and creates lead generation for medium to large-scale companies. She regularly speaks at local and national events on a variety of subjects including: social media, PR, analytics and content strategy.


Meghan Bergman

Social Media Strategist

@meghanracquel Meghan Bergman

Meghan joined the Hubbard Interactive team as a Social Media Strategist in 2018. She leverages her background in marketing, content creation, and blogging to make a digital impact for her clients across many different brand categories. Hailing from the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Journalism, Meghan capitalizes on her writing and communications skills to produce creative campaigns, build meaningful relationships with others, and work effectively with her clients. Fueled by coffee, she finds herself consistently staying on top of the latest social media trends and always looking for her next project. When not scrolling through her many social feeds, you can most likely find Meghan working out at the gym, or whipping up a deliciously healthy meal. She is passionate about health and fitness, and recently became certified as a personal trainer.


Ruth Tambornino

Digital Brand Strategist

Ruth Tambornino is the Digital Brand Strategist at Hubbard Interactive, Hubbard’s Digital Agency. Prior to joining Hubbard Interactive, she Senior Manager of Field Strategy at Dex Media. Her role at Dex included bringing new digital products to market, training marketing consultants and working with key client accounts. In addition to Dex Media, Ruth spent a year working with a start up software company as Director of Sale Enablement. Ruth has over 10 years of experience in digital marketing. A former small business owner and Real Estate professional, Ruth understands the challenges business owners face. Her professional focus is to educate business owners on the importance of digital marketing. With solid understanding of messaging and digital platforms, Ruth has worked with 100’s of clients locally and nationally, impacting their business in a positive way. Areas of expertise include PPC, SEO, Digital Display, Websites and Mobile platforms. Over the course of her career, Ruth has received several awards for sales and training. She is certified in Google AdWords and is currently completing her business degree at Saint Mary’s University. She is also on the Board of Directors for Alliance of Women in Media.


Pat Laeger

Videographer/Producer

@PatLaeger Pat Laeger

As the Videographer for Hubbard Interactive, Pat produces videos for the Twin Cities Hubbard Radio stations that range from event recaps to social video promos. He also produces an array of videos for sales clients – from testimonial videos to product how-to videos; from spotlight interview videos to animated infographic videos. He loves to tell stories – big or small. He has two dogs named #OakleyRembrandt and #GemmaWatson (check out their hashtags on Instagram!).


Jayna Wilcox

Senior Digital Sales Strategist

@jaynaanderson_

Jayna Wilcox is the Senior Digital Sales Strategist at 2060 Digital. Along with a degree in Strategic Communication, she studied Fashion at the University of Minnesota, which makes her an avid trend seeker across a variety of industries. She is able to see the importance of digital media converting into sales and has an understanding of both a big and small brand standpoint, as she did social media for Mall of America, prior to joining the Hubbard Interactive team. Always interested in the latest and upcoming trends in social & digital media, fashion, and health, Jayna has a very futuristic mindset and is always seeking “what’s next” to improve her clients’ needs. Jayna is a Hubbard NextGen, a group that was selected within the company to come up with ideas for the future.


South Dakota recently launched a new anti-meth marketing campaign that has gone viral. But is it all over the internet for the right reason? That’s what we discuss in this episode with Tatum Richards, who recently moved from South Dakota, and Chris Norris, who has worked on other public health marketing campaigns.


Shownotes


Episode Transcript

Missy 0:00
Welcome to the social feed podcast. I’m your host Missy, thank you for listening. In this episode, we get into an interesting topic that has been on everyone’s radar for the past week. I would say since the campaign launched “Meth We’re on it” is South Dakota’s newest anti-meth campaign. And everyone has been talking about how it was executed. Is this the right way to bring awareness and we wanted to really dissect the campaign. the good, the bad, the ugly and everything in between about how we got to this point. We have two guests on the episode Tatum Richards who’s actually from South Dakota and brought this campaign to light when it first launched. The campaign features a bunch of people from her hometown and different areas around South Dakota. So she really dives into be the resident and how that impact is on her. And then we have Chris Norris, whose background is in working on multiple campaigns that involve like the opioid crisis and working with the Red Cross on blood donations and getting more awareness to the public in that fact. So we dive in really deep from both sides of that for this campaign. So let’s get into this week’s episode number 99 “Meth- We’re on it” South Dakota’s anti-meth campaign. So many of you have probably seen all over your LinkedIn feeds the news, social media in general. South Dakota launched a new campaign the past week, that has been blowing up everyone’s feeds called “Meth- We’re on it.” And is everything about trying to you know, bring light to the addiction which they definitely have. I’ll say in the best way. That’s what we’re talking about today. So uh, Tatum being the South Dakota resident, and growing up there. I want to get your thoughts on been from there what you thought about this campaign when you first saw it.

Tatum 1:49
It definitely grabbed my attention initially, because homestate is the logo, the big slogan on it. I will say I don’t love it. It’s not my favorite.

Pat 2:06
Because you’re from South Dakota or just in general?

Missy 2:09
Do you find it offensive? Being from South Dakota, like, what are your thoughts?

Tatum 2:13
I don’t, I don’t know if it necessarily find offensive. I mean, people think we’re on meth now, so that’s not ideal. But more so just that I think it didn’t really hit the mark and achieve the goal that it was intended to. So I don’t know that I’m offended. I’m just confused.

Missy 2:33
So Chris, and I’m really curious about your opinion on this campaign. Will you talk a little bit about your background? Because I feel like that’s pretty perfect for what this show idea is.

Chris 2:41
Yeah. So prior to my time at Hubbard, I spent about four years in the public health marketing world. So working on campaigns like anti-tobacco, anti-obesity, and prevention campaigns, things like that. And so this campaign was right up my alley. I had never worked specifically on a meth campaign, but from what I can gather from this campaign, this is an example of what it looks like when nobody involved really understands what they’re trying to accomplish, or has worked on a public health or behavior change campaign in the past. Because if you had done any research or done any focus groups or anything like that, and really understood kind of the public health problem that they were trying to address, when you would not make light of it, and to there would be much more of kind of a segmented approach to the audiences to address the issue and put out a message that kind of resonates with the people that they’re actually trying to target. This seemed like they were trying to target almost like LinkedIn and Twitter and just get a rise out of the media and other agencies. And I mean, mission accomplished there. Here we are, but in terms of actually addressing the meth addiction problem that they’re allegedly trying to address they did not.

Missy 3:56
What’s interesting about the campaign is there in with the creative like Tatum you mentioned, they used The state of you know, South Dakota and they put the tagline “Meth- We’re on it”. But then they have all these images of like the football team and the captain and, you know, the farmer and all these different images that they’re using with that tagline. So I was kind of curious when you, Chris, you talked about the segments. What their thought process was when they were putting that together.

Chris 4:20
I mean, I don’t think there was one to be like. I mean,

like, it’s just, there’s clearly a lack of understanding like, both in the like the the local agency that we that presented this to the client in South Dakota, and then also on the clients we have, it’s just, like, incredibly clear that nobody understood what they were trying to accomplish. And everyone just kind of shrugged them in like, Oh, yeah, that sounds cool. We’ll get for four days of attention talking about North Dakota like I’m sure. Or South Dakota Excuse me. I’m sure South Dakota is indexing way higher on Google right now than it was last week which could result Dakota but but to what end? Yeah, and I mean it to your point about the images. I mean, like they’re one of them. There’s three kids, it looks like they’re under 18. And

Tatum 5:06
yeah, it says, Oh, I know the kids actually, that’s from my hometown on my high school football field. And,

Pat 5:13
of course, you know them

Missy 5:14
so they actually went to South Dakota and these images are from South Dakota?

Tatum 5:16
Yeah. I mean, one of the I mean, obviously, the people in images disclaimer, are not on meth. But, I mean, my vice principal is in one of the images from high school. So I just wondered, I think, are we trying to say, you know, like, there’s more math than you think, like, meth’s all around. Like, I’m assuming that was the approach, but just not. It didn’t come across that way.

Missy 5:40
What I’m curious about is so this campaign cost half million dollars to put together so they so obviously, this agency, like pitch this idea to them to South Dakota to put this together, and then it sounds like not everyone in the town got involved because they’re in the campaign, which I didn’t even know that part that they were actually people from South Dakota. Yeah. So how did we get here? It’s kind of my question.

Tatum 6:04
Well, I know they. So governor Noem asked for agencies to pitch her last summer. So this has been ongoing for a while. So, for a campaign that’s been happening for so long, or in the works, at least you think this has been run by a few heads down them. But um, anyway, so yeah, and I know, a bunch of agencies, at least nine from in-state pitch here as well. So that’s how it came about I guess. She asked for open pitches for out of the box ideas and this one was the winner.

Chris 6:45
I think something that’s interesting to me about this is it this is a great example of a campaign where traditional marketing metrics aren’t how you should measure success because they’re gonna see a ton of impressions on this ton of reach ton of engagement obviously, probably ton of website visits as a result, they’ve gotten a ton of PR out of it, like they were in the New York Times I saw, but I don’t think anybody who looked at this critically and put any thought into it would look at any of those metrics and be like, yeah, this campaign helps reduce meth use in our state. And so the like, kind of the traditional agency lens on this I think is where got problematic because they just saw and it’s like, we get a ton of impressions a ton of reach a ton of engagement. That’s how we’ve measured success in our past campaigns with soda company X, you know, or shoe company Y, and in the behavior change and public health world, that’s just not how you measure success. And, I mean, the result is just this kind of a disaster.

Pat 7:47
I just, I just find it almost offensive. It just there’s nothing about the campaign that speaks to the the problem or any sort of solution to the problem. And when we’re talking about marketing, almost anything, we’re always we’re generally trying to point to solutions like, you know, if you need a home built, we can help you build a home if you need, if you’re hungry, this food will satisfy your hunger in this campaign, there’s nothing about it, it draws more attention to the meth. And using pictures of people that aren’t on meth. I mean, not that you want a bunch of pictures of people that are on meth, but at least that would highlight the problem- I don’t know, it’s there’s just like Chris was saying it’s just the they were going for the wrong metrics, at the detriment of I think anything positive that could be accomplished by a big statewide campaign like this over an issue that needs to be addressed and, you know, fixed.

Missy 8:56
So there is the president of the agency that did this campaign. It said in an article because now that is getting national attention, she’s getting a lot of being spoken to a lot. She said we knew is going to be provocative. We wanted to do something different. Because it really does really impact all of South Dakota. So that imagery we have for it is really inclusive. She said

Chris 9:17
something different is instead of reducing meth use, they might be increasing it. So good job there.

Tatum 9:23
Yeah, I mean, my feed the past week has just been memes on memes of meth and people like editing photos, and it’s having on every platform, Snapchat, Twitter, I’ve seen it on Facebook. So until Marks himself safe from the meth use. And like, I mean, they run some really funny creative things I’ve seen. So I think to your point, it’s creating awareness but the absolute wrong kind of awareness and it’s not. That was one of my kind of problems with this campaign as well as the didn’t have a A call to action. Like you said, Pat, like it doesn’t. So okay, great. So what do we do about it? There’s no, you know, how do we seek help towards epidemic and there’s nothing really promoting it just kind of that it’s there and now it’s can just be made fun of so

Chris 10:17
the other thing that’s interesting about this campaign is I was just thinking, who is this for? Like, who is struggling with meth addiction or any sort of addiction, sees one of these images or see some of these stories and things? You know what? I think I’m going to go get help for my addiction. I just that’s not the type of campaign it is. It’s not empathetic to those addictions, or anything.

Pat 10:39
It doesn’t give anybody who sees it anywhere to go. Like it doesn’t it doesn’t give them anything to do like, Oh, yeah, I’m struggling with a meth addiction. I saw this campaign now I know exactly who to call to, to help because I don’t want to be addicted to meth anymore. No,

Tatum 10:55
I’m not the only one on mass here obviously, so it’s probably fine.

Missy 11:00
It almost makes it cool in a strange way. That’s how the ads are and they have bumper stickers now with meth were on it like they this agency put together a ton of creative around

Chris 11:09
there are bumper stickers?

Tatum 11:10
Bumper stickers, pop sockets, hats..

Missy 11:13
Like swag there is swag.

Tatum 11:15
So it costs this campaign is closer to 1.5 million. So the because of the merch and swag and media placement and TV ads, and the campaign itself is slated to be running through May. So this isn’t, yeah,

Missy 11:32
this is going to be we’re going to be seeing this for a while.

Tatum 11:34
And I saw a quote that said unless we need to take it down sooner kind of thing. But

Chris 11:42
yeah, that was the other thing. You read the quote from the agency. And just generally speaking, if you’re an agency and you’re working on a project, and less than a week after it launches, you feel compelled to come out with this statement defending that work. That’s when you know you’ve stepped in it a little bit. And I mean, they’re obviously not going to admit it. And I get that, but I think it everyone involved kind of recognizes that they may have overplayed their hand a little bit with all the comments they’re making about maybe reducing the budget or trying to defend it in weird ways.

Missy 12:15
Yeah, I’m really curious when you’re talking about the results, like, what what is that going to look like in the next five to six months as far as meth usage? And are they going to report back on that and how this campaign is helping? And is there like, I haven’t tried to search? Is there a website that people can go to learn more about it?

Tatum 12:31
The website title is onmeth.com.

Missy 12:34
Oh, okay. That’s okay.

Tatum 12:36
So if you want to go there?

Missy 12:39
Pulling it up now!

Pat 12:41
Will our spam filters get flagged?

Missy 12:43
I’m waiting for IT to be like, what are you doing?

Tatum 12:45
I did it on my work computer too so fingers crossed there

Chris 12:50
I will say the one decent thing that campaign did if you actually look at the content at the site, it’s decent, they have resources for people to get addiction help, or if whether you are the person addicted or your family member who knows somebody that’s addicted. So there is like a kernel of, I guess, goodness, and there is just, you’ve like slept all this nonsense on top of it that you can’t like people aren’t even talking about that part of it. Like you didn’t even know that they had that those materials. And that’s really what they should be promoting in a more interesting way but they’ve just kind of slapped this nonsensical bumper sticker over everything.

Pat 13:27
So my biggest question at this point is when the governor put the pitch out, like what was the obviously meth addiction, is something that they wanted to solve, but what was the point of asking for campaigns? Are they trying to are they are they just trying to reduce meth usage? And so they needed some crazy national campaign like how does how does this marketing affect anything done in South Dakota towards meth addiction prevention and so on?

Chris 13:59
So I will say I did not read the RFP of the South Dakota put out. But generally speaking, I’m sure what they did is they identified we have a high percentage of addiction in our state. And then they determined that a hyper as high percentage of those addicted or addicted to meth, and it’s like disproportionate to other states. And it seems like that’s what they solved. And so they said, Okay, well, we need a campaign focused on education about addiction to meth, and then we needed and then part of that campaign needs to be providing resources to people who are addicted and want to get help. So I would imagine that’s where it started. It started in a good place. But yeah, again, like you get these, like traditional agencies who haven’t worked in this field and haven’t spent time with like the public health research, and you get like a Pepsi campaign for a public health like topic and then this can be the result sometimes.

Tatum 14:53
Right- Yeah. And I know the meth statistics in South Dakota are crazy. Higher than they are 2x the national average,

Missy 15:01
Yes twice as many teenagers in South Dakota between ages 12 and 17 have reported using meth in the past year, which is like way.

Tatum 15:09
So it’s definitely a problem that she wanted to address. I know, going into her time as Governor, so I think that’s kind of probably obviously where it’s done from sure.

Missy 15:21
There’s really just an article about how Meth use is a surging in South Dakota and the government is desperate to stop the crisis. They say it’s hurting every resident and then that’s why this campaign this campaign came about.

Chris 15:32
Which that part is true- like that is a good foundation.

Tatum 15:37
Awesome. I think we should have a campaign for sure.

Chris 15:41
I mean, what did you think when you saw it?

Missy 15:43
At first, I thought, this is like, I hate to even say it a lot. I laughed. I thought it was hilarious. Like, I was like, This is so funny.

Tatum 15:49
You thought I was kidding.

Missy 15:50
I thought I thought it was a joke about our Slack channel and I was like, oh my god. I’m like South Dakota. That’s funny, you know? And then I was like, This isn’t real. And then as I started people start talking about morals like there. They actually think this is like a campaign that’s going to help solve a serious, serious crisis and like I grew up in a rural farm town. So meth is an issue in my area as well. And if I saw people from my school or were like, I went on those boards saying “Meth, We’re on it.” I would be offended. That’s why I asked you if you were offended, because it’s like you’re from your area. I was like, what that that’s just I don’t know. I don’t like it.

Tatum 16:30
I honestly I want to say I wish I was surprised. That’s so bad, but I just I don’t know. Man. I just think there’s a line. I saw a quote and I really liked it. And it was, at what point does clever cross the line to become insensitive? Yeah. And I think this is the clear line. South Dakota has done another campaign for “Don’t Jerk and Drive”

Missy 17:00
South Dakota has a history it sounds like..

Tatum 17:01
It has a quite a history of using kind of controversial out there campaigns and slogans to get people’s attention. And don’t my thing was don’t drink and drive is like, you can kind of play on that, like, it’s not a subject, you’re talking about swerving in a car. And also, it’s like a funny sexual inuendo. And so you can, you can play on that. And it’s funny. And that’s a subject matter that you can kind of use this kind of slogan on by twisting the words and using them in that matter for meth. I just think probably shouldn’t have gone there.

Missy 17:37
I’m curious, Chris, what your thoughts are on because you’ve launched other campaigns for awareness? What is the right way to do something like this? Because we know this is not the right way.

Chris 17:47
Yeah. I mean, the first question that you would want answered in the meeting between the agency and the client would be what are we trying to accomplish? Like what does success look like for this campaign does it does success look like follow up research where people in for example, South Dakota, know more about meth addiction than they did a year ago? Does success look like increased enrollments and, addiction services, things like that. And so that would be the where you would start. And then the next piece of that is you would want to like figure out who are you actually targeting? Are you targeting 18 to 25 year old young adults? Are you targeting 55+? Are you targeting women? Are you targeting men? Are you targeting minorities? Are you targeting like white males, for example? And then determine within that audience why how did they get to on the path to where they are addicted to meth? Because it’s not like they just woke up one day or like, okay, cool, I’m gonna I want to be addicted to meth. Like there’s, there’s a path there. There’s a reasoning there, maybe they were in pain, maybe they felt like they, you know, they didn’t have anything going for them. There’s all these reasons that if like, focus groups, like online, like you can take online surveys, there might already be research out there. If anybody just kind of pump the brakes and stop you. That’s where you would have started. And then once you determine what those audiences are in segmented, you would have figured out why. Or what’s the most common reason why they’re getting addicted to meth. And then you would have addressed that head on and offered services with that lens.

Missy 19:15
Yeah, this it’s interesting, too, because with this podcast, with all the conversation coming up, I was like, Oh, do I want to contribute another piece of content to this campaign? So invite inside me, I was like, oh, but I’m like, we need to talk about this one, because the agency was was from Minnesota, which is where we’re based out of, and also just because of, we kept coming up in conversations. I was like, we need to really dive into this and like, what’s the right way to do it?

Pat 19:39
Is there a way that this campaign is effective for what they’re trying to accomplish?

Chris 19:49
I mean, it’s gonna it will be effective in the sense that nobody’s going to do this again, and like try this approach. I mean, but like in terms of actually reducing meth addiction or increasing services. I mean, I would love to be wrong in this case, because I would like people to get the help they need, but I just don’t see it.

Pat 20:10
Not from this campaign specifically?

Chris 20:12
No.

Tatum 20:13
I agree with Chris. Like, again, I hope I’m wrong, but I just see it on. It’s a snap filter now like, and it’s a you know, it’s just a big joke. So I don’t think it’s necessarily doing anything but making a joke out of math and if anything, potentially making it more popular, so

Missy 20:33
I’m curious what because we work with Hazelton and Betty Ford as one of our clients and so I’m curious what other Institute’s like that that help people with drug abuse what they’re thinking about this campaign because they are there are taking light of it. South Dakota is with this and I’m just kind of curious what their thoughts are on that. Would love to love to hear that.

Pat 20:55
I mean, just in the in the few projects I’ve worked on with Hazelton and Betty Ford- they’re so they’re so serious and intentional about the wording they use and talking about addiction because it’s real people that are affected by it’s real families that are affected by it. And I just I can’t see anything even close to this getting getting past that filter. It’s just It seems so insensitive and so impersonal even though they’re using pictures of real people but there’s no there’s no context there’s no story there’s no there’s no feeling behind it and like Chris was saying, there’s lots of feelings and lots of emotions and write up that go into somebody getting to the point where they’re addicted to meth that you can’t just throw that out and put a slap a cool saying on a bumper sticker and fix it.

Chris 21:54
What is fascinating to me about this campaign is think like imagine being at Thanksgiving dinner next week, and somebody in your family saying I have an addiction, I’m looking to get help. And then somebody in your family laughing at them. That’s essentially what South Dakota has gotten all of us to do. Which is wild.

Missy 22:15
Yeah. That’s that’s so true. That’s so true. And that’s why when I really wouldn’t tell you something, I was like, this has to be a joke. Yeah, there’s no way.

Tatum 22:23
I mean, that’s the premise of it. Honestly, the font is almost kind of even a mean font. Like it kind of looks like But yeah, I mean, it’s just such a serious matter that shouldn’t be made light of and it just got totally twisted around.

Missy 22:42
And it sounds like I mean, the governor of South Dakota standing behind it as well. Obviously, the agency is too but she’s been tweeting and posting about that.

Tatum 22:51
She had a tweet and she said the goal was awareness. So I think it’s working. Well, okay, like we kind of talked about earlier. Sure, the goal is awareness, but it’s the wrong awareness. So I don’t know.

Missy 23:06
I feel like when you do a follow up podcast in like three or four months, I know the results of this and what happens. I’m curious what happened, what happens with that agency and what that looks like, because that’s a whole branding thing for them to know having this on their list.

Chris 23:19
Yeah. This is the campaign they’re known for now.

Pat 23:22
So say, I’m just trying to think of trying to redeem this a little bit.

Tatum 23:28
Pat’s like, Can we spin it positive?

Pat 23:31
If this was like the first phase of a campaign. Would that make this more okay? Like, if this was say, you said, it’s like that if this was the first two or three months of a six month campaign, and then they switched to something else with that? Would that make it okay?

Tatum 23:55
I see what you’re saying. But I almost want to say it’s too far gone. I don’t know.

Chris 23:57
I think I mean anything any changes they made to more effective campaigns moving forward would be in spite of this there’s no I just don’t see any successful road to build up this which sounds like is what you’re asking. Um, but yeah, I mean yeah there’s still time for them to salvage something out of the timeline and the amount of money they spend on this but not building off this slogan.

They’d be starting over basically.

Tatum 24:25
I mean, yes, this grab people’s attention, but it’s still playing right now. If you’ve seen things about you know, get help here. Mess like I just see the word meth out when I’m like, making fun of my campaign. You What do you see Meth now you think of South Dakota? Yeah. That’s that’s what, that’s great.

Chris 24:47
I would bet $100 that this is going to be on a Simpsons episode in the next two years.

Tatum 24:52
I’m waiting for SNL this Saturday. At least the Weekend Update I’m betting on that.

Chris 24:59
Oh, that’s a lock.

Missy 25:03
Oh my gosh. Well, I think we’ve talked enough about the math campaign is there anything else you guys want to add any parting words?

Tatum 25:11
Good intentions, bad execution there.

Missy 25:13
That’s that’s the perfect way to end this segment. So hopefully, future podcasts will have some better campaigns. All the links we talked about in today’s podcast will be the show notes at socialfeedpodcast.com/ep99. We’d love to hear what you think about this episode, and past episodes. If you could leave us a rating on Apple podcasts or wherever you listen to the social feed, we would appreciate that. And thank you guys for listening. We’ll be back in two weeks to record our hundredth episode of the social feed. Oh we made it will be doing that live from Hubbard digital Academy. If you haven’t been to it Academy or want to come again. You can register at Harvard digital academy. com. Be sure to use code podcast 50 for 50% off your ticket. We have a few seats left and we’d love for you to attend.

Pat 26:01
Yeah, that’s December night. So it’s coming up pretty quick. But yeah, we still have tickets left in US podcast 50 for half off your ticket. We’d love to see you there.

Missy 26:09
We’ll see you all in two weeks.

Announcer 26:12
The Social Feed is a production of Hubbard Interactive with music provided by a Minneapolis-based artist John Atwell


On This Episode

Missy Young

Social Media Services Manager

@miss_shredbetty Missy Young

As the Social Media Services Manager for Hubbard Interactive, Missy Young’s position entails working with clients and team members to drive social media strategy and lead initiatives to identify new technologies and digital best practices. She develops customized micro and macro campaigns that drive online interaction, promotes and creates content that enhances the customer experience and creates lead generation for medium to large-scale companies. She regularly speaks at local and national events on a variety of subjects including: social media, PR, analytics and content strategy.


Chris Norris

Social Media Operations Manager, Hubbard Interactive

Chris is the Social Media Operations Manager at Hubbard Interactive and oversees the day to day operations of the social media team. Prior to joining Hubbard, he worked on public health and social change marketing campaigns as a strategist. Previously, he was a failed entrepreneur and successful Peace Corps volunteer.


Tatum Richards

Social Media Coordinator, Hubbard Interactive

@tatum_richards Tatum Richards

Tatum Richards graduated from the University of South Dakota with a degree in Media & Journalism Strategic Communications and minor in Sport Media Marketing. Passionate about all things copy, Tatum enjoys helping brands deliver their message in a voice that resonates. If Tatum’s not drafting up kick-butt client content, you can find her teaching dance classes in the evenings or hitting the links on sunny weekends!


Pat Laeger

Videographer/Producer

@PatLaeger Pat Laeger

As the Videographer for Hubbard Interactive, Pat produces videos for the Twin Cities Hubbard Radio stations that range from event recaps to social video promos. He also produces an array of videos for sales clients – from testimonial videos to product how-to videos; from spotlight interview videos to animated infographic videos. He loves to tell stories – big or small. He has two dogs named #OakleyRembrandt and #GemmaWatson (check out their hashtags on Instagram!).


Getting Google to see you and rank you high in search results is a tall order, so are there tools and tricks to make it easier? That’s what we discus in this episode. Ruth Tambornino and Sam O’Byrne are digital strategists at Hubbard Interactive and offer some tips on getting ranked higher on Google for businesses who are just looking to discover and expand their online presence.


Shownotes


Episode Transcript

Missy Young 0:00
Welcome to the social feed podcast. I’m your host Missy, thank you for listening. In this episode. If you are a business owner and you’re wondering how the heck do I get Google to see me? We’re going to tell you all about what you should be looking for online. We give you tips, tricks, and some really great advice from Ruth Tambornino and Sam O’Byrne, who are a digital brand strategist at Hubbard Interactive. So let’s get into this week’s episode number 98. Auditing your online brand. So what’s the first thing you should be doing when you are auditing your online brand?Ruth Tambornino 0:31
I would say the first thing that’s that you should do is use an incognito window. A lot of people think that they’re coming up really well in search results for their business. But the reality is that they go to their website 12 times a day. So Google just keeps bringing them up at the top of the search result go I’m doing great. Yeah, yeah, it’s a false sense of vanity actually. So what you want to do is in case you don’t know what a incognito window is, is at the top right. corner of your screen, there’s like three dots, you click on that. And there’s an option for a new incognito window and the screens going to be black, so you know that you’re in the right spot. And that has zero cookies, no save data or anything. So it’s going to be a true search result. So you want to start there and just google yourself and see what happens. or Google your industry, maybe not your own website. And then also, maybe have some friends or you can do it yourself, but you want to search from different locations as well. So searching from the same location that you’re sitting in, is obviously going to bring up a search result. That’s because that’s near me, right? So that’s number one. That’s where you guys start. Yeah,Sam O’Byrne 1:43
I couldn’t agree more with that. giving yourself a search and to ruse point search both for your name and you know, possibly your name in quotations, maybe even your phone number or address, um, see how those things pop up or somebody might be searching for you, as well as searching for some of your top products. Top products or service lines, see if you’re showing up in some of those searches that you expect you should be. See where you’re showing up if it’s page two, or three or four might not necessarily be so valuable. And once you kind of can get to that, that basic, you know, how do I feel about my my search rankings or where I show up, then you can get into this a lot of tools that we use to really identify how many keywords are ranking for what those are and things. But oftentimes, the best place to start is just give yourself a Google search. Yeah,Missy Young 2:26
what’s like a good report card? Like you type in your name incognito mode, and you’re in the top 10? Or maybe your list says five? Is that good? Is that bad? Obviously, there’s room for improvement there.Ruth Tambornino 2:36
I would say that you want to be on page one for sure.

Sam O’Byrne 2:40
Yeah, I’d say if anything, if you’re searching for your own name, you want to have multiple listings on page one, you want to show up multiple times from different ways. One might be your website. Another might be a social property, or even depending on your industry, you might want your Yelp reviews to show up or your reviews from another another location. So it’s all those things where if you’re searching for your own branded name, I hope that it There’s multiple results that should show up on that first page. If you’re searching for your services, your main service lines you want those be first page, but you should expect to have more competition there too. So you might be, you know, two or three, even if somebody else is number one, that’s not the end of the world. But if you’re searching for your own brand and name, I’m definitely hoping you’re showing up right away. And again, multiple times

Pat Laeger 3:21
what’s what’s more important searching for your own name or searching for products or services that you offer?

Ruth Tambornino 3:27
That’s a great question. And it all depends on the business. And I would say as well, you want to be googling your competitors to to see how they’re coming up, because it isn’t just about how you’re showing up. It’s what it’s what are they doing, which also can give you some strategy on Hey, they’re doing this maybe I should be doing that too.

Sam O’Byrne 3:45
Yeah, and I would say that what tourists point one is it more important than the other. If you have a lot of brand recognition in the space, if everybody knows your name, then you definitely better be showing up for your name. But if you want to be reaching out to people who never heard of you before, then Those services are your product lines are going to be extremely important because if they don’t know your name, and that’s the only way you’re coming up in search, then you’ll never be able to expand your audience through searches on Google Yahoo. Bing,

Missy Young 4:12
so I searched for, like car dealer near me. And I get, you know, auto Mart, Sally’s automotive, Metro motor sales. But those are all in the map section, right? And then Luther auto, which is a pretty big dealership and town is down. It’s still on the first page, but it’s in the in the more organic section. How do you get in the map section? And how important is that?

Ruth Tambornino 4:32
Well, it’s really important, especially as we’re seeing more of those car dealership near me searches. So it’s actually become a lot more important than it even was maybe a year ago. But it’s important to remember that the map section and the organic section both have their own algorithms. So just because you’ve mastered one or the other doesn’t mean you’ve mastered both of them. So I will also say that you’ll see those rotate, just like the organic search Does so just because you’re coming up on the first page of the maps, you might not be tomorrow or next week or whatever. So this is an ongoing process that you want to be monitoring all the time.

Sam O’Byrne 5:09
You bet. I would say that as far as making sure you do show up in the map section. First thing is most businesses that have a physical location probably already have a maps listing, it’s important to make sure that you control it though. If it’s if it’s your business, you find yourself in maps, but you don’t actually have control of that, you will actually have the ability to go in there and say, This is mine. Google will go through a process to confirm oftentimes, they might send a physical postcard to the address listed things like that with a code on it. But it is important that you have control of that and that you use that to the best of your ability, add images that that you’ve added in, make sure that all of your about information there is accurate and optimized, make sure that your hours are accurate. Another thing is just like you can place ads and organic or above organic search results. You can place ads in the maps as well. So if you’re not showing up there, it’s important to Find a way to I guess that brings in another point of reviews on Google Maps are extremely important. No matter how great you feel like your web presences. If somebody’s going to find you a maps, a lot of times, the only thing to look at is that that those review numbers, and then they’ll they’ll decide what business they’re going with. If you have a 2.5. And you’re right, next, someone who’s got a 4.5 chances are, they’re gonna go see your competitor there.

Ruth Tambornino 6:23
Yeah, that brings up another good point about conversion. So coming up on the first page is great. But if people aren’t compelled to select you for various reasons, having the right content, having an SEO strategy, those are all really important, just to make sure that you’re actually getting people to engage with you. The other thing too, as far as placement goes, is we see a giant jump in conversions if you’re in the top three to five positions versus those five to 10 positions. So and it’s it’s harder for us to get a client when we’re doing SEO for them from page it’s harder for it’s easier. For us to get them from page to page one or even page four to page one, that it is for us to get them from position eight to position for that. So getting moving up that first page is is quite a challenge.

Missy Young 7:11
When you guys have talked about reviews, does the number of reviews you have factor into that algorithm? Like the more reviews, the higher you’ll show up? Or is that more just a vanity thing? So definitely, yes.

Sam O’Byrne 7:25
Yeah, so the number of reviews definitely matters. Google wants to make sure people are having a positive experience. Yeah. Because if people are using Google search, and then they find a business on Google search and have a terrible experience, some people might actually blame Google on Google does want that to happen. So yeah, if you have a larger number of reviews that are all mostly positive, Google is more likely to show you than a competitor

when they have the opportunity to show both of you.

Missy Young 7:51
So let’s move to the clients websites. So if you’re listening and you know you have your website, what are some updates or teach me some cheat tools you can use to make sure that set up for success. To be shown on Google,

Ruth Tambornino 8:02
one that I really liked, because it’s super easy is just think with Google, just, you know, you can just literally Google that. And you can do a speed test. For those of you who need a little help, that’s okay, if you do. But you’re just going to put your URL in there, and it’s going to run a report card for you. And it’s going to give you some information that may not make sense to you. But it’s going to make sense to a developer. If your site’s really slow or whatnot, it’s going to give you a picture of things you can do to to improve that, that you can share with the developer. That’s an easy first step.

Sam O’Byrne 8:32
Yeah. And I really like that because making sure that you have a good mobile sites feed in particular, is a big ranking factor for Google. So if you run one of those speed tests, like Ruth said, that should give you both a desktop and mobile score. And even if it does spit out a lot of recommendations that you might not directly understand. Hopefully, you have a web developer who can help you out and make some of those changes. Another tool that I might recommend right away would be well, when we’re talking about free tools, would be spy food spy FQ I’m sorry.

But anyways, it is a great tool because it can allow you to see up, you know, the number of the volume of organic keywords that you rank for, where those are within those top 50. As well as what some of those keywords are. The other big benefit, despite who is you can run your competitors websites through there too. And see, if there’s a big competitor in your space. And they’re doing things better than you, you can start seeing what areas they might be edging you out on. Now, with the free version, you only get some results. And if you want to pay for I think they might even do 30 days free trial, which might be enough for a small business, not for an agency like us. But for small business that might be enough. That kind of tool can give you a lot of great ideas on what you’re doing well, and if there if you’re not ranking for your service areas, maybe you better start writing some content about those and getting them online. What kind

Pat Laeger 9:57
of what kind of stuff is Google Looking for, like you said, page load speed? Like, is it number of pages on the website? Is it amount of videos, texts? Like what? What sort of stuff is Google really looking for?

Ruth Tambornino 10:10
It’s all of those things. I was just gonna say that another tool that that would be really invaluable to pay attention to is just your Google Analytics. Because user experience is where I mean, it’s probably in the top, you know, to Yeah, of what Google’s gauging. So those page views, the bounce rate, how how long somebody stays on your site, do they come back, all of those things are playing into it. And Google Analytics is free, for a reason, because they’re also capturing all your data and probably using it but but you still, that’s literally the richest information you’re going to get as far as how people are engaging, and how are they finding you?

Sam O’Byrne 10:47
You bet. And as far as the, you know, what ranking metrics are most important Google, there’s some, you know, well over 200 different items that they that they take into consideration with those rankings. And you have to remember that those are they’re taking those into consideration for both you and every other of those, you know, 3 billion listings that come up when somebody searches for something. So it’s important, they do take care of some of those big ones that are, you know, like page load speed, is it mobile friendly. Also, as far as the content goes, you want to make sure it is readable by Google, a lot of times people will upload an image their site, and those uploaded as you know, jpg 7438 dot image, or whatever. And if they do that, then Google when it’s reading through the site will look at that image as as blank space. And the only information it has is, you know, image 143782. jpg, or whatever I just said. And it won’t say that this is an image of, you know, a family in front of a home. So oftentimes, making sure that you feed that information to Google is really important. Which brings up another point of ADA compliance if you have a website that somebody who’s blind couldn’t use, for example, that can also have have impact. So you need to make sure that something like a screen reader Somebody who’s blind is using your site, it’s gonna be able to go through and read all the content to them. And Google Doc you if it’s not if it’s not a DA compliant, or if you’re trying to trick Google, they’ll also dock you for those things to how does

Missy Young 12:12
Google is there like another cheat tool that you can use to make to see if your site is a DA compliant or anything like that.

Ruth Tambornino 12:19
So

this is going to become a huge focus of conversation in the next probably, I mean, it already has become more and more but I would think in the next 18 months, we’re going to be hearing even more about it. And and the requirements are so vague, that it’s really difficult for just about any business. The first businesses that have been affected really by it, I would think are the health care industry and also legal, those are the ones that have been, I think making a huge migration to become a DA compliant. Whereas some of our you know e commerce and things like that are a little slower on the on the adoption rate there

Sam O’Byrne 12:59
you Yeah, if you for what it’s worth, there aren’t a lot of super easy tools for checking everything with ADA compliance. There are some for checking certain areas. For example, if you’re, you know, for users who are blue, green, or if sorry, red green color blind, eight, Adobe offers tools that allow you to make sure there’s enough contrast between your color and the backgrounds, the text color in the background, things like that. So that even if you are colorblind, it would show up appropriately. What I would recommend for that is a Google WCAG. Two point O those are the web access or website content accessibility guidelines.

Ruth Tambornino 13:34
Sounds fun. Yep.

Sam O’Byrne 13:36
Super fun. If

Ruth Tambornino 13:37
you have insomnia, you just pulled that out.

Sam O’Byrne 13:40
That does give you kind of the three main tiers of ADA compliance, everything from as I mentioned earlier, making sure that somebody who has a screen reader could that screen reader could read all the content to them all the way through to the top tier Where’s if you are doing a live video, it creates closed captioning for audiences who are You don’t necessarily need to hit every single one of those. But I would say that in those guidelines, they’re broken out by a double A and triple A, if you can hit all the double A ones, which most medium and small businesses can, you’ll be in good shape. If you’re a Coca Cola of the world, you better be hitting those triple A’s too. But

Ruth Tambornino 14:17
well, it does. I think the your, your online profile does play into how important this is. We actually have a client right now who was redoing their website. And it’s a giant project because they had a person trying to purchase a ticket on their website and was unable to do so because of a site issue that they had and file a lawsuit actually one. So it’s not, it is something that matters. It’s just something we’re going to start hearing more and more about because, sadly, that community of people who’ve kind of had to tolerate not being able to, you know, read things or whatever, they’re big, they’re gaining a voice, which is a great thing. Yeah. You definitely want that. We all we want Avoid lawsuits if we can and maybe just be more proactive, but it is it’s a really it’s a hot topic that I think it’s just going to gain more momentum.

Sam O’Byrne 15:08
Yeah. Especially with, you know, people accidentally discriminating if you only allow applications online, but then you have somebody who’s colorblind is cannot can’t go through your website or a blog can go through your website, you know, are you discriminating against that person? You kind of are, you know, not intentionally, but it’s one of those things that needs to be be taken care of just like having a handicap accessible building. You should it should be something that should be thought about every time you build a new website,

Missy Young 15:30
as long as we’re talking about all these super fun, regulations.

gd PR compliance, can you talk a little bit about what that is and what you need to do? Yeah,

Ruth Tambornino 15:43
just hide.

Sam O’Byrne 15:47
So yeah, with the GDPR it’s all around data privacy, and right now it’s a it’s those are laws that really only affect users located in Europe. If you have people coming from Europe, coming to your site, be sure to either block them so they stopped coming or, or get up on those those regulations really quickly because you do need to allow them to have access to all the information you’re collecting and the ability to to tell you, they don’t want you to collect it, or what means you want to collect it for so at its most basic, that’s pretty much GDPR. But it’s one of those things where it’s, it is an extremely complex, it’s so complex that they’re currently companies that all they do is GDPR compliance, consulting. So if you do work heavily in Europe, I would recommend contacting one of them and making sure your legal team or continental lawyer about it as well, because the fines can be astronomical and forth even though right now it’s only European users. America is likely to follow suit at some point once Congress gets their stuff together. So maybe and

Ruth Tambornino 16:53
I would also say that we’re seeing more and more websites and any consumer is seeing more and more that are just that’s popping up with You know, you gotta click that I agree to your you know, except the cookie. Yeah, you know, which is just a smart thing to do. So I would say as a business owner, just go through that step so that you are just covering yourself it’s

Missy Young 17:12
not that hard to hover interactive. com and our role to help our legal team was like you need to put verbiage on the bottom of your site about Yeah, so just like, Oh, I want to bring this up during this podcast.

Ruth Tambornino 17:23
Yeah. Sadly,

Pat Laeger 17:25
it’s kind of annoying from a user standpoint whenever I go to a new way. Except I’m

Ruth Tambornino 17:30
like rebellious a little bit. So I don’t really like to click the Yes Okay, you can have my information but you do,

Pat Laeger 17:38
I guess gotta go along with and it makes sense to me like, I want to make sure I’m giving my any info that they might get to the right people and not the wrong people. But still, it’s one extra clicks

Ruth Tambornino 17:48
voluntarily saying yes, you can have all my information. The truth is they have it anyway. So

Missy Young 17:55
yeah, so we talked a lot about keywords coming up in searches, using those keywords. blogging has been a huge thing that you to talk about constantly with clients. Tell me a little bit more about how someone can start a blog. And what’s the best way to get that content out there.

Sam O’Byrne 18:10
What I always recommend for a client to start a blog is come up with your top five or 10 frequently asked questions and write an article about them. It’s the easiest content free to write because you already know the answers. But then thinking with search terms in mind, so that the art is can I write this thing where it’s going to be SEO friendly, but also be consumer friendly? And that’s not always easy to do. But that’s where I would start with blogging. Yeah, I think that’s that’s a really great point, starting with those frequently asked questions, because it’s likely that people are searching for those as well. The other thing to note about blogging is creating a content calendar planning it out. A lot of times we’ll have clients were like, yeah, I run a blog and there, they started out good and they wrote three or four topics, then it just sat by the wayside because they were busy running their business. So if you write out a content calendar and have dates with specific categories, Want to write about specific topics you want to write about, you’re going to be much more likely to follow through with that content. I’d say Another thing to note about blog writing or any you know, I guess really blog writing particular is have a mixture of content have some that’s evergreen content like those FAQs or or you know, 10 things to help your basement never flood whatever that whatever your industry is. Something that’s winning might switch at any time as well as here and now content. Like we just hired missy. Missy is the best social strategist this side of the Mississippi.

Pat Laeger 19:31
I’m lying, different,

Ruth Tambornino 19:34
different podcast.

Sam O’Byrne 19:37
But it is important to have a mixture of those content that stuff that’s going to be forever there as well as some of you know if you have press releases or new products, things that are more important today than forever. Having that mixture of content does feel more natural to people than just having, you know 40 BuzzFeed articles in a row.

Missy Young 19:53
How long should have blog be?

Ruth Tambornino 19:56
That’s actually changed it like six months ago, it was like 200 50 to 500 words. And now Google’s looking for more like White Paper Type 1500 word type blog. So we still on average are sticking to the to 50 to 500. blog or word count for our blogs. But we are seeing more and more need for that longer. But it has to be strategic. I mean, you don’t just, you know, nobody’s going to read a novel. And you have to remember that, if you’re writing papers like that, it’s literally just for the search engines. It’s not for your consumer, because it’s unlikely anybody’s actually going to take the time to read all that unless you’ve got an extremely interesting topic, which certainly there’s some out there, but

Sam O’Byrne 20:36
yeah, I would say Tachyon to that, you know, write it as long as it’s necessary for the topic. You know, don’t don’t don’t just lengthen it just because you have to link those keywords in there saying, Yeah, just do do what feels natural, because again, people need to read it, if you want them to be engaging. Or if you’re writing it just for for the search engines, then you know, you might be a little bit longer but you Then you don’t want it to be you’re around an 80 page novel, if it’s never gonna be useful to anyone that’s not a productive use of your time

Pat Laeger 21:06
is the so you say you’re writing a blog for more so for the search engines, then then the user, if that page rarely gets visited on your site, is that going to hurt you in search results at all?

Ruth Tambornino 21:17
You know, my, my thought on on this whole thing is if you’re thinking about a topic, and you’re not sure if it’s valuable, type it into Google and see what the search results look like, if there’s 3 million websites that address that content, that might be a good one to

Sam O’Byrne 21:30
write. You know, you know, that’s, yeah, you can also use the tools like Google Trends and see if people are talking about that are searching for those topics already. So I would say, Yeah, I’d agree with that, you know, writing content just for SEO, if nobody’s coming to the site, it won’t necessarily hurt you, but it’s not necessarily gonna help you either. You do want to write content that is going to generally have people coming to the site and sticking around off of based off of what they’re reading.

Ruth Tambornino 21:54
So you could start with Google Analytics First, look at your pages, figure out how much traffic goes to each page. Start with the highest traffic pages, that would be a good place to start. Yeah, which

Sam O’Byrne 22:03
of those content pieces are keeping people around,

Missy Young 22:05
we had a client that we had worked with, and they had a recipe on their site about lactation cookies for a recipe for this was for a birthing center, obviously. And it was the highest visited, like blog on their site. So then they focused on more recipes from that, but I was like, interesting that that is what people are going to, like shock factor, are they Okay, are

Pat Laeger 22:29
they the only one who has content like

Ruth Tambornino 22:33
that later? Yeah.

Pat Laeger 22:36
incognito window.

Missy Young 22:40
So the other thing that I think is a huge trend, not even a trend, it’s just kind of part of naturally what everyone’s doing now is video blogs. Yes. How does that affect search? Because it’s not actual text. And what does that look like?

Sam O’Byrne 22:54
So I will say that with video, Google is actively working on trying to get their algorithms to Pull content directly from video so they can index the video that said, they’re working on it. They were also working on Google Glass couple years ago. And here we are, I would say that the best thing you can do is if you do have a video like that, make sure that a you have closed captioning. If it’s one that you’ve pre recorded, and you you know, write out the transcript of what was there if you can, if you can take the time, and add that as a closed caption or even have a transcript of what was what was read that that’s readable by Google,

Ruth Tambornino 23:24
even just titling your content correctly, can help. So I mean, it doesn’t even have to be overly complicated. It’s just rather than video ABC. It should be titled something that someone would search for. The other thing we kind of skipped over with the blogs was the snippets and the increase of volume of leveraging that kind of content for your website. It’s a way for especially if you’re in a really competitive heading, it’s a way for you to win some SEO without having this 18 month strategy. You know, if you can write the

Missy Young 23:57
so when you say snippets, like what part are

Ruth Tambornino 23:59
you so much When you search for something like, how do I fix my sink, and then you get these results of people also searched for, and those kinds of things, if you’re writing content like that, those while we’re all doing it, we just didn’t realize what they were. But But everybody, I mean, at least me, but I mean, you start all of a sudden you’re an hour later, you’ve looked at 25 different things because it’s intriguing and it’s a right in line with what you were looking for. And you finally find what you’re, you know, what you intended for. So,

Sam O’Byrne 24:28
yeah, and those featured snippets, it’s like I just googled, you know, best TVs 2019 and an article from PC mag comes up and it shows it shows a little bit of the article right there in the snippet in the search results. And I guarantee you that particular article is you know, considerably more traffic than anything else on this page, because it has the most real estate on the page. So anytime you have a you know, to roost point, if you can write content for for example, if you have a if you have something in your industry that is regularly searched for Nobody has possession of that event snippet, write a piece, write a blog that answers that question directly. And if you can get a lot of traffic to that, you might take that event snippet spot and then boom, that’s a huge boon to your traffic. Or if you look at some of those questions, and the what’s in that event snippet is from 2014, or 2013 is an old piece of content. Right? That because Google also wants up something real relevant and recent.

Pat Laeger 25:22
That’s a huge point, Ruth, is that what gets hit when you do a voice search for something? Say, Alexa? What’s the best TV for 2019? Is that event snippet going to bed?

Sam O’Byrne 25:33
It is what Alexa is going to read to you. Yeah, exactly. Same as a, OK, Google is gonna do the same thing. So if you are the one that invents of it, that means that Google trust that you’re the, you know, authoritative source for this particular question. And yeah, they’ll it’ll get read right off to you and again, now more people will go into voice search or using those devices that’s an even even more beneficial in just in a different way. Because you know, through your Alexia not likely to come visit my website, but still a few other ones. providing that information. It’s still a

Ruth Tambornino 26:01
whole nother conversation.

Missy Young 26:04
podcast.

Ruth Tambornino 26:06
Yeah, for sure.

Missy Young 26:08
Um, go back, jump back to the video piece. So you mentioned like putting the transcript on there. So I mean, sort of to record the video, because we talked about doing that with us podcasts like we should have a transcript on socially podcast. com. Yeah.

Pat Laeger 26:20
It’s not easy to type

Missy Young 26:21
that out. There are a couple tools though they use,

Ruth Tambornino 26:25
like

Missy Young 26:26
those tools that maybe you could use.

Pat Laeger 26:29
Yeah. So otter Ott er, is a good one that I’ve used before. It’s a app you can download on your phone and just hit record at the beginning of a meeting or your video recording or this podcast. I haven’t going on my phone right now to test it out and equal, and they do that one does a pretty good job. Sometimes it misses punctuation, and it doesn’t always recognize different speakers. And so you should proofread that but for you know, half an hour podcast episode that we’re doing, how detailed Are we going to be going through everything but for Two to three minute video that you’re putting on your website. Yeah, that’s definitely something you can go through and proofread. Even if you’re using one of those free tools, but there are paid ones as well. That you could actually Rev. com is one of them that that we’ve used, and you actually send your file to someone to

Ruth Tambornino 27:18
get a high schooler to do this.

Missy Young 27:22
Like an intern for

Sam O’Byrne 27:25
you pay per minute a video basically, and then they type it and send that transcript or those captions back to you. And so you know, that a real person is seeing those, so it’s going to be more accurate, but you’d have to pay a little bit of money for it. And again, that’s that’s important because you know, as of right now, with the podcast, we’re missing an entire audience of people who might be deaf. Whereas if we have that transcript on there, they could read through what’s what we’re what we’re talking about, and they could read through that information. Same with, same with we posted a video about something and we don’t you know, if we don’t have closed captioning on there, you know, that’s, that’s a lost audience, and an underserved audience too. So doing those things right. Will will help your rankings for that piece of content.

Missy Young 28:02
And then as far as embedding that video onto your site, do you guys recommend upload it to a YouTube channel and embedding it because of, you know, Google, obviously? Or would you do it just regulate? Just upload it to the site?

Ruth Tambornino 28:15
I would usually save embed it right in the site. But that doesn’t, I don’t know that there’s a hard fast okay.

Sam O’Byrne 28:22
to that one, I’d say I’d say it depends on the content. You know, if you’ve been bedded just on your site, and it’s just yours, there’s a couple of benefits to that. One is, you know, at the end of that video, it’s not going to show somebody else’s related content. And five minutes later, they’re watching somebody try to eat his own fist. You know, whatever they

Ruth Tambornino 28:37
are, they’re on somebody else’s website. Now. I mean, you don’t control that user really, if they’re, if it’s done differently, but you know, again,

Pat Laeger 28:45
lots of questions about you just going

Sam O’Byrne 28:48
What are you watching? And the second side of this argument is that you know, it is it can be beneficial to post them on YouTube because YouTube is a searchable by Google. It’s an owned by Google Well as if somebody might stumble upon your site based on the YouTube video then if you do it that way, because somebody because it would be again, indexed by Google. So I would say it depends on the concept. You could do both.

Ruth Tambornino 29:10
I mean, it’s not like one or the other. Really? You bet.

Missy Young 29:13
Yeah, exactly. And then Ruth, and you’re talking about those column snippets? So above that, Sam when you pull that up, there’s those Google Shopping ads. Yeah, yes. So let’s talk about that a little bit cuz that’s probably holder section of that. So those who have ecommerce, tell me about that.

Ruth Tambornino 29:28
Yeah, these are extremely effective, as you mean, we all know,

you don’t even go down the page anymore if you see the pictures. So we’ve got, you know, some clients that we work with that are are doing these ads, and they’re extremely effective, but they’re also very time consuming. Depending on how many skews you have this could be not even worth it. In some cases, I would say you would probably want to start with your top sellers, maybe your 10 top sellers and experiment with those that way.

Sam O’Byrne 30:00
Yeah. And it is worth noting that those are purchased spots, you know, just like

Ruth Tambornino 30:05
part of an AdWords Can you

Sam O’Byrne 30:06
basically You bet. And to this point you might even something you might want to put a, you know, an intern on or something because you can get stuck in XL hell for a while, try trying to set all that information up and feed it directly to Google appropriately so pulls the right image with the right text with the right link with the right pricing and all that so it can be it can be a beast, but they’re extremely effective for e commerce call. Yeah,

Ruth Tambornino 30:29
the other the other caveat there too is what are you using for your e commerce or your point of sale? So you know, those all have to play well together too. So that factors? Yeah.

Missy Young 30:40
Is there any other advice? We’ve talked about a lot of different things. So so far, a lot of like free cheat tools and and tips. But is there any other piece of advice you guys would give for someone who’s just really looking to do a deep dive audit for their brand?

Sam O’Byrne 30:53
Um, I guess I would say there’s two other areas that we’ve never really talked about for your digital footprint that are Huge one being social media. Obviously you want to make sure that you have strong social channels a strong brand and can be viewed to talk about that and think you might know a little about. But the other side is your local listings for any company that’s got physical locations that can be a big piece. And what I mean by that is, if you’re on Yellow Pages com or dex calm or

Pat Laeger 31:21
wait, those are still around,

Sam O’Byrne 31:23
say, yes, they search Citysearch, yes, Yelp, Yelp, it’s one of those things where you’re going to be on those whether you realize it or not. And it’s important to make sure that information is accurate has again the right address, and it’s all listed the same way. So you’re not 123 fake st st in one, but 123, fake St. STRET. And another you want to make sure that it’s it’s all the exact same phone number, the exact same address the exact same way that they list your business name. So it is important to go through that there are some tools to do that. None of them for free. that I know of anyways, but there are some like Yext is one that jumps out at me Yandex where you could you could pull one of those audits, it’ll say Yep, you listed it correctly and 90%. But these 10% needed an adjustment. And you can auto auto push that to repopulate all those sites. So it is worth wild and are worth noting that those local local indexing is important to

Missy Young 32:14
know, how do you guys stay up to date with all the changes with the algorithm? There’s certain sites you go to newsletters, you subscribe to give a shout out to the people listening because I need it to

Ruth Tambornino 32:23
help me out here. Search Engine Land is a huge one that I follow. And I get regular updates from I mean, Google sends out great content.

Sam O’Byrne 32:31
Yeah, I think with

Ruth Tambornino 32:32
Google, like you said with Google is a great resource. Sam’s probably got someone Yeah,

Sam O’Byrne 32:36
another one. I I go to those same two quite a bit. But another one that I go to regularly is Seo. Maz? Oh, yeah. Yeah, the Maas blog, they they even do a tracker where every time there’s an update to Google’s algorithm. They try and notate what changes they saw with their clients. So we might say this, this update had a had a strong effect on mobiles, non mobile friendly websites so this had a strong effect. sites that do with dentistry. So that can be there’s a great tracker tool on Ma’s calm that that you can use as well. But I would say Search Engine Land is a big one. They have varied opinions as to how they do.

Ruth Tambornino 33:12
They also it’s digestible. So you don’t have to be extremely techie to really understand what they’re talking about. But they oftentimes will know about things that are coming to not don’t necessarily know, in detail, but they kind of get water dropped like this is coming. And Google’s going to turn everything upside down again. So they’re, they’re a good resource. That’s my probably my big but I would also say we rely on each other, and we rely on our partners to know Yeah, because you can’t be an expert in everything. There’s just no way. Yeah, just try to stay as up to date as possible.

Missy Young 33:47
We’ll make sure to include all the links we talked about in today’s podcast at the show notes at socially podcast.com slash ep 98. Thank you guys so much for being on today.

Ruth Tambornino 33:55
Yeah, thank you so much for having us.

Pat Laeger 33:57
One thing I want to mention before we wrap this up is that we’re basically doing all of this that we talked about today on an individual level at our next Hubbard digital Academy, which is December 9 at Earl brown Heritage Center in Brooklyn center, Minnesota, and Ruth and then one of our other her interactive employees, Gina Anderson will be doing brand audits and going through a lot of these tools with specific brands. So if you’re overwhelmed by all of this and just need someone to talk to about it, as well as attend a bunch of great sessions throughout the day on video and influencer marketing and social media, and stuff that we didn’t get into today, but Harvard digital Academy is going to be a great opportunity for you to just learn in and dive into this world. And then we’re also doing these free brand audits as well. If you buy a ticket and right now, just for listeners of this podcast, we have a special discount code for you. We will give you 50% off the ticket price for HD a go to Hubbard digital academy. com Buy your tickets and use the promo code podcast 50 podcast 50 you’ll get half off your registration. And that’s December night. So we’ve sold out in the past, so don’t wait too long.

Missy Young 35:07
That sounds like you’ve done that a few times. Oh, wow, that radio is coming out. Make sure to subscribe to the social feed podcast with Apple podcasts or your favorite podcast player to get a brand new episode delivered right to every Wednesday. We’d love to hear what you guys think about these episodes, go to facebook and join our group. Search for social feed podcast and let us know what you think or give us rating and review on Apple podcasts. Thank you for listening. We’ll see you next week.

Announcer 35:31
The social feed is a production of Hubbard interactive with music provided by Minneapolis based artist john at well


On This Episode

Missy Young

Social Media Services Manager

@miss_shredbetty Missy Young

As the Social Media Services Manager for Hubbard Interactive, Missy Young’s position entails working with clients and team members to drive social media strategy and lead initiatives to identify new technologies and digital best practices. She develops customized micro and macro campaigns that drive online interaction, promotes and creates content that enhances the customer experience and creates lead generation for medium to large-scale companies. She regularly speaks at local and national events on a variety of subjects including: social media, PR, analytics and content strategy.


Ruth Tambornino

Digital Brand Strategist

Ruth Tambornino is the Digital Brand Strategist at Hubbard Interactive, Hubbard’s Digital Agency. Prior to joining Hubbard Interactive, she Senior Manager of Field Strategy at Dex Media. Her role at Dex included bringing new digital products to market, training marketing consultants and working with key client accounts. In addition to Dex Media, Ruth spent a year working with a start up software company as Director of Sale Enablement. Ruth has over 10 years of experience in digital marketing. A former small business owner and Real Estate professional, Ruth understands the challenges business owners face. Her professional focus is to educate business owners on the importance of digital marketing. With solid understanding of messaging and digital platforms, Ruth has worked with 100’s of clients locally and nationally, impacting their business in a positive way. Areas of expertise include PPC, SEO, Digital Display, Websites and Mobile platforms. Over the course of her career, Ruth has received several awards for sales and training. She is certified in Google AdWords and is currently completing her business degree at Saint Mary’s University. She is also on the Board of Directors for Alliance of Women in Media.


Sam O’Byrne

Digital Brand Strategist

@im_just_sam

Sam O’Byrne is a Digital Brand Strategist at Hubbard Interactive. Since finishing school at the University of Minnesota, Sam has become an experienced digital strategist with over 10 years of planning, creating, and executing digital solutions. Sam has extensive experience working with businesses, government organizations, public health initiatives and non-profits from fortune 500s to tiny mom and pop bakeries. Sam holds certifications from Google in AdWords and analytics as well as various other certifications from Bing, Microsoft and Hubspot.


Pat Laeger

Videographer/Producer

@PatLaeger Pat Laeger

As the Videographer for Hubbard Interactive, Pat produces videos for the Twin Cities Hubbard Radio stations that range from event recaps to social video promos. He also produces an array of videos for sales clients – from testimonial videos to product how-to videos; from spotlight interview videos to animated infographic videos. He loves to tell stories – big or small. He has two dogs named #OakleyRembrandt and #GemmaWatson (check out their hashtags on Instagram!).


How To Make Everything is a YouTube channel that explores things we use everyday (and some we don’t). Host Andy George takes his curiosity and learns how to make everything from scratch. A sandwich, glasses, an obsidian sward, clothing are some of the things he’s made from scratch for YouTube. In this episode we talk with him about how he grew to over 1 million subscribers on YouTube and amassed millions and millions of views on his videos. Andy shares some tips on dealing with comments, the rigorous schedule of producing a weekly YouTube video and how to deal with the ever-changing YouTube algorithm.


Shownotes


On This Episode

Missy Young

Social Media Services Manager

@miss_shredbetty Missy Young

As the Social Media Services Manager for Hubbard Interactive, Missy Young’s position entails working with clients and team members to drive social media strategy and lead initiatives to identify new technologies and digital best practices. She develops customized micro and macro campaigns that drive online interaction, promotes and creates content that enhances the customer experience and creates lead generation for medium to large-scale companies. She regularly speaks at local and national events on a variety of subjects including: social media, PR, analytics and content strategy.


Andy George

Creator, How To Make Everything

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfIqCzQJXvYj9ssCoHq327g

Andy George is the creator and host of How to Make Everything, a Youtube channel that attempts to deconstruct the complexity of modern life by attempting to recreate every day objects, starting from scratch.


Pat Laeger

Videographer/Producer

@PatLaeger Pat Laeger

As the Videographer for Hubbard Interactive, Pat produces videos for the Twin Cities Hubbard Radio stations that range from event recaps to social video promos. He also produces an array of videos for sales clients – from testimonial videos to product how-to videos; from spotlight interview videos to animated infographic videos. He loves to tell stories – big or small. He has two dogs named #OakleyRembrandt and #GemmaWatson (check out their hashtags on Instagram!).


When it comes to marketing around a holiday, there are some good campaigns and there are some questionable campaigns. For Halloween, we took a look at some really cool marketing ideas and ads for spooky season and talked about a couple campaigns that we thought could have been better.


Shownotes


On This Episode

Missy Young

Social Media Services Manager

@miss_shredbetty Missy Young

As the Social Media Services Manager for Hubbard Interactive, Missy Young’s position entails working with clients and team members to drive social media strategy and lead initiatives to identify new technologies and digital best practices. She develops customized micro and macro campaigns that drive online interaction, promotes and creates content that enhances the customer experience and creates lead generation for medium to large-scale companies. She regularly speaks at local and national events on a variety of subjects including: social media, PR, analytics and content strategy.


Katie Mullenbach

Social Media Coordinator

@katiemullenbach Katie Mullenbach

Katie Mullenbach is a Social Media Coordinator for Hubbard Interactive. She graduated from the University of Minnesota with a Strategic Communication degree and minor in Anthropology. She loves staying in the loop with current events and social media trends that are evolving daily. She thrives while collaborating with her team of Social Media Strategist’s to bring clients the very best engaging campaigns and creative content. Katie uses her experience in Anthropology to put herself in consumer’s shoes to understand what should be said or visually expressed to encourage action. Having previously worked in social media and print media, Katie is always eager to learn new techniques and tools. You can say writing and music are her “fortés.” On the weekends you can find her DJ’ing with friends or performing in Downtown Minneapolis.


Pat Laeger

Videographer/Producer

@PatLaeger Pat Laeger

As the Videographer for Hubbard Interactive, Pat produces videos for the Twin Cities Hubbard Radio stations that range from event recaps to social video promos. He also produces an array of videos for sales clients – from testimonial videos to product how-to videos; from spotlight interview videos to animated infographic videos. He loves to tell stories – big or small. He has two dogs named #OakleyRembrandt and #GemmaWatson (check out their hashtags on Instagram!).


Kaylie Schmidt and Meghan Bergman, two members of the Hubbard Interactive team, went to the Rock What You Got Conference, and came back to tell us their takeaways.

YOU HAVE PERSONAL POWER

Power of Energy: Cultivate positive energy around you
Power of Thoughts: If you think you can you will!
Power of Words: Words create your life
Power of Vision: You have to see it to make it happen.
Power of Writing: When you write it down, you realize it.
Power of Action: You must take action to make a change
Power of Spiritual Creator: Find your spiritual dimension, your core space

FOUR WAYS TO USE YOUR POWER

ADDERS:
Are you adding to your life?
Are you adding to the lives of others?

SUBTRACTORS:
Are you subtracting from your life?
Are you subtracting from the lives of others?

MULTIPLIERS:
Are you creating more power with your power?
How are you increasing the positivity and power in your life and the lives of others?

DIVIDERS:
Are you using your power to create a divide between yourself and others?
Are you creating a division in this world, or using your power for good?


Shownotes


On This Episode

Missy Young

Social Media Services Manager

@miss_shredbetty Missy Young

As the Social Media Services Manager for Hubbard Interactive, Missy Young’s position entails working with clients and team members to drive social media strategy and lead initiatives to identify new technologies and digital best practices. She develops customized micro and macro campaigns that drive online interaction, promotes and creates content that enhances the customer experience and creates lead generation for medium to large-scale companies. She regularly speaks at local and national events on a variety of subjects including: social media, PR, analytics and content strategy.


Meghan Bergman

Social Media Strategist

@meghanracquel Meghan Bergman

Meghan joined the Hubbard Interactive team as a Social Media Strategist in 2018. She leverages her background in marketing, content creation, and blogging to make a digital impact for her clients across many different brand categories. Hailing from the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Journalism, Meghan capitalizes on her writing and communications skills to produce creative campaigns, build meaningful relationships with others, and work effectively with her clients. Fueled by coffee, she finds herself consistently staying on top of the latest social media trends and always looking for her next project. When not scrolling through her many social feeds, you can most likely find Meghan working out at the gym, or whipping up a deliciously healthy meal. She is passionate about health and fitness, and recently became certified as a personal trainer.


Pat Laeger

Videographer/Producer

@PatLaeger Pat Laeger

As the Videographer for Hubbard Interactive, Pat produces videos for the Twin Cities Hubbard Radio stations that range from event recaps to social video promos. He also produces an array of videos for sales clients – from testimonial videos to product how-to videos; from spotlight interview videos to animated infographic videos. He loves to tell stories – big or small. He has two dogs named #OakleyRembrandt and #GemmaWatson (check out their hashtags on Instagram!).


Kemps is a big name in dairy in the midwest, and they are always coming out with new products and finding the best ways to communicate with their customers. In this episode we talk to Addie Dunker, who runs all social media channels for Kemps, about what it’s like to market in the food industry.


Shownotes


Sponsor

Popped Corn

Sue launched PoppedCorn with one goal in mind – Creating and offering the best locally popped fresh popcorn and fudge on the planet.

Sue, Anna and Marcus have created over 70 unique and delicious flavors.  Every holiday brings something special and a taste reflecting the season.

Visit poppedcorn.com to see the flavors and order yours today!



On This Episode

Missy Young

Social Media Services Manager

@miss_shredbetty Missy Young

As the Social Media Services Manager for Hubbard Interactive, Missy Young’s position entails working with clients and team members to drive social media strategy and lead initiatives to identify new technologies and digital best practices. She develops customized micro and macro campaigns that drive online interaction, promotes and creates content that enhances the customer experience and creates lead generation for medium to large-scale companies. She regularly speaks at local and national events on a variety of subjects including: social media, PR, analytics and content strategy.


Addie Dunker

Social Media Community Specialist, Kemps

Addie Dunker

After attending St. Cloud State University for Relational Communication Studies and Community Health Addie made the move to the Twin Cities to officially start her career in marketing. She began with a small digital marketing agency as a Social Media Manager. Working for a smaller agency gave her hands on experience and continual opportunities to learn and grow. After two years and one promotion she was ready to take her career to the next level and accepted a position in the marketing department for Kemps as the Social Media Community Manager. She is honored to work for such a beloved and dedicated Midwest brand. Being a Midwest girl at heart, in her free time Addie enjoys anything and everything involving the great outdoors— hiking and camping to name a couple, and exploring all that the twin cities has to offer.


Pat Laeger

Videographer/Producer

@PatLaeger Pat Laeger

As the Videographer for Hubbard Interactive, Pat produces videos for the Twin Cities Hubbard Radio stations that range from event recaps to social video promos. He also produces an array of videos for sales clients – from testimonial videos to product how-to videos; from spotlight interview videos to animated infographic videos. He loves to tell stories – big or small. He has two dogs named #OakleyRembrandt and #GemmaWatson (check out their hashtags on Instagram!).


On this episode our guest host Adriana sat down with makers from the Great Lakes to the Great Plains at the recent MNBloggerBash event hosted at Rose & Loon. We wanted to know how these makers got their start and how they transitioned from side hustle to full on career, how do they advertise with small budgets, and what advice they’d give to someone wanting to make the leap to pursuing their passion projects.


Featured Makers


Shownotes


Sponsor

Popped Corn

Sue launched PoppedCorn with one goal in mind – Creating and offering the best locally popped fresh popcorn and fudge on the planet.

Sue, Anna and Marcus have created over 70 unique and delicious flavors.  Every holiday brings something special and a taste reflecting the season.

Visit poppedcorn.com to see the flavors and order yours today!



On This Episode

Missy Young

Social Media Services Manager

@miss_shredbetty Missy Young

As the Social Media Services Manager for Hubbard Interactive, Missy Young’s position entails working with clients and team members to drive social media strategy and lead initiatives to identify new technologies and digital best practices. She develops customized micro and macro campaigns that drive online interaction, promotes and creates content that enhances the customer experience and creates lead generation for medium to large-scale companies. She regularly speaks at local and national events on a variety of subjects including: social media, PR, analytics and content strategy.


Adriana Velez

Social Media Coordinator

@sincerely_ami Adriana Velez

With a career path that has so far been more confusing than the plot line of a Telenovela, Adriana brings knowledge from multiple areas of digital marketing. She graduated from the University of St. Thomas with a degree in Business Law and was a cheerleader during her time there. As a Social Media Coordinator at Hubbard Interactive, she brings company voices to life through social media content. With multiple HubSpot certifications and knowledge in Inbound Marketing, she knows the importance of lead nurturing. With passion for all things email, she is able to take a hands-off approach to engaging with customers and nurturing leads as they go through the buyer’s journey. When she isn’t geeking out over digital marketing you can find her blogging about mental health, capturing her trendy life living in North Loop, and taking pictures of her dog and cat.


Pet photos and videos are arguably the cutest content on social media. But what happens when there’s an emergency situation with a pet family member? Animal Emergency & Referral Center of Minnesota has been around for over 40 years for those situations. They care for a wide variety of animals and offer many specialists and therapies. In this episode we chat with Heidi, the marketing director from Animal Emergency & Referral Center of Minnesota about their online presence. She talks about how they balance education, awareness, cute animals, and everything that comes with emergency pet care both in person and online.


Shownotes


Sponsor

Popped Corn

Sue launched PoppedCorn with one goal in mind – Creating and offering the best locally popped fresh popcorn and fudge on the planet.

Sue, Anna and Marcus have created over 70 unique and delicious flavors.  Every holiday brings something special and a taste reflecting the season.

Visit poppedcorn.com to see the flavors and order yours today!



On This Episode

Missy Young

Social Media Services Manager

@miss_shredbetty Missy Young

As the Social Media Services Manager for Hubbard Interactive, Missy Young’s position entails working with clients and team members to drive social media strategy and lead initiatives to identify new technologies and digital best practices. She develops customized micro and macro campaigns that drive online interaction, promotes and creates content that enhances the customer experience and creates lead generation for medium to large-scale companies. She regularly speaks at local and national events on a variety of subjects including: social media, PR, analytics and content strategy.


Heidi Brenegan

Chief Marketing Officer, AERC

Heidi Brenegan

Heidi Brenegan has worked within the veterinary profession for over thirty years, and in her current role at Animal Emergency & Referral Center of Minnesota for fourteen years. AERC is the only locally-owned emergency and specialty veterinary hospital in Minnesota. In her role as Chief Marketing Officer, Heidi assumes creative control of all of AERC’s marketing – whether directed towards pet owners or veterinarians. She very much enjoys marrying the hospital’s distinct, fun brand with content and visuals to create marketing campaigns for a variety of channels that garner attention and stand out from the crowd. She loves her job and feels very grateful that she has the privilege of working with the amazing veterinary professionals at AERC.


Pat Laeger

Videographer/Producer

@PatLaeger Pat Laeger

As the Videographer for Hubbard Interactive, Pat produces videos for the Twin Cities Hubbard Radio stations that range from event recaps to social video promos. He also produces an array of videos for sales clients – from testimonial videos to product how-to videos; from spotlight interview videos to animated infographic videos. He loves to tell stories – big or small. He has two dogs named #OakleyRembrandt and #GemmaWatson (check out their hashtags on Instagram!).